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  1. Default

    H4350 and a 140gr bullet would be what I would start with also.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
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    Central California
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    224

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhHeyThereBen View Post
    After re-sizing, I washed them all with hot water and dish soap which made them nice and clean (I don't have a wet tumbler and figured that this would help break loose anything on the inside).
    Get yourself a small wet tumbler from harbor freight and some steel pins with a scoop of lemi shine and dawn dish soap and that brass will look good as new!

  3. #28

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    Then again why mess with it? It's hardly a rare commodity.

    https://ammoseek.com/reloading/brass/6.5mm-creedmoor

  4. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by antelopedundee View Post
    Then again why mess with it? It's hardly a rare commodity.

    https://ammoseek.com/reloading/brass/6.5mm-creedmoor
    Yeah, there's still a bunch of it at the local range as well. Looking at the prices out there I think I should just go and pick up a bunch while it's there. Then I wouldn't have to pay shipping.
    Old Milwaukee Pro Staff

  5. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhHeyThereBen View Post
    Yeah, there's still a bunch of it at the local range as well. Looking at the prices out there I think I should just go and pick up a bunch while it's there. Then I wouldn't have to pay shipping.
    So where does your local range get it from? Do they buy in bulk and resell? Do they know the history of it? I'd only use range brass if I saw the guy next to me shoot it from a new box and leave it on the ground. That way you know it's once fired. If you're going to put that much effort in cleaning it then why not start with a known commodity?

    Some sellers at gunbroker.com have decent prices on known stuff, but you have to accept their word for it.

    The bullet makers generate brass when test firing their production. I expect that they sell the once-fired cases to someone so maybe you could find out who they are selling them to.

  6. #31

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    Nah. At this point I'll probably end up just buying new brass once I'm actually worried about shooting the tiniest of groups. All of the brass at the range is in really good shape. Just a few dings here and there. No signs of reloading at all (Chamfer or deburr of the case mouth, marks from a resizing die, etc) and I didn't feel any sign of case separation when I scratched in there with a paper clip. So I'm pretty sure it's all once-fired. And like the other guys said above - I really doubt a reloader would leave their brass at the range like that.

    We'll see how the groups turn out. I'll probably grab another batch of brass to have some spares. Then after I have the rifle broken in I'll splurge on some higher quality stuff.

    Any of you guys really notice that much difference in group size when comparing brass brands? I've heard a few bad things about Winchester brass, but Remington, Hornady, Nosler, and Starline seem to offer really good quality at a much lower price. I'm sure Lapua is really nice, but I really don't see myself spending that much money on brass.
    Old Milwaukee Pro Staff

  7. #32

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    All brass can produce accurate ammo. It's the prep and sorting by weight or case volume that makes it work.
    Some brands are just more over all consistent in case weight , making the wall thickness more uniform. Some punch flash holes and some drill them, some uniform the primer pockets and trim and changer for you, but all that can be done yourself as needed to equal them all out, after sorting.

  8. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Millsworks View Post
    All brass can produce accurate ammo. It's the prep and sorting by weight or case volume that makes it work.
    Some brands are just more over all consistent in case weight , making the wall thickness more uniform. Some punch flash holes and some drill them, some uniform the primer pockets and trim and changer for you, but all that can be done yourself as needed to equal them all out, after sorting.
    After sorting do you usually toss the brass that's outside of the mean weight by a certain percentage? I did notice that 2 of the 47 pieces of Hornady brass I had were noticeably lighter/heavier than the others. Do you typically just toss that brass?
    Old Milwaukee Pro Staff

  9. #34

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    I am no expert, but the infamous “Houston warehouse trials” suggested neck tensions were far more important for accuracy than case volume (case weight is just a proxy for this) or primer choice. For sub 500 yards elk accuracy I would just worry about the safety issues such a care for in spection of primer area, stress signs, case length, etc. But no harm in a weight sorting of mixed brass, but wouldn’t bother with purchased brass.
    Freedom Is Not Free

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