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  1. Default Buying my first bow

    I am in the market to purchase my first hunting bow. I am new to archery and donít know much at all. I have done some research and have an idea of what Iím looking for but some input would be awesome. My setback is I am on a strict budget of $500, for bow, sight, and quiver. Any input would be awesome

  2. #2

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    Tons of great entry level bows on the market today.

    My advice is to go to a dealer and test drive all the ones in your price range and choose from them. Good luck.

  3. #3

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    Be sure to check out the USED bow selection. Better prices and easier to get fully set up at your price point. Good luck!
    Guns don't kill people. Dads with pretty daughters do!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Seeley Lake, Mt
    Posts
    585

    Default

    For your first bow go to a local pro shop and ask a lot of questions. They should be able to give you a good idea of where you should start. I would stay away from the big box stores and the internet where the first objective is to separate you from your money. The local shop can let you try some bows and give you some lessons to get you going and tune your set up to you. Sure it may cost you a little more but in the long run it will save you money with getting you set up right the first time.

    Dan

  5. #5

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    Buy used. Bow technology hasn’t changed that much in years. Take a good look at traditional archery, a lot simpler as far as equipment goes. I’m really considering selling all my compound stuff and go traditional- ish lol.

  6. #6

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    To echo what has been said your local bow shop will be the best place to start. They will be able to fit you which I believe is the most important part of buying and new bow and will be able to point you in the right direction at your price point.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan O View Post
    For your first bow go to a local pro shop and ask a lot of questions. They should be able to give you a good idea of where you should start. I would stay away from the big box stores and the internet where the first objective is to separate you from your money. The local shop can let you try some bows and give you some lessons to get you going and tune your set up to you. Sure it may cost you a little more but in the long run it will save you money with getting you set up right the first time.

    Dan
    This
    "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are."

    -Theodore Roosevelt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Western South Dakota
    Posts
    122

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    If you are shopping used, which your local shop probably has a selection of, knowing your correct draw length is important. When I started long ago, mine was off and bad habits are hard to get rid of in archery.

  9. #9

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    Go to archery talk and look in the classified section. I have bought 3-5 off of there. You can get a higher end bow that is 3-4 years old over there for cheap.

  10. #10

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    +1 on archery talk classified section. I have had good success finding great deals there. As others have stated go to local archery pro shop to get measured and be sure you know your draw length requirements, etc and can try something out. Lots of those pro shop guys seem to get new bows every year so this time of year there are usually good deals to be had on lightly used bows. You should have no problem getting a whole setup (quality, at that) for <$500 if you buy a bow that's a few years old. If you're not comfortable buying from archery talk then usually the local archery shop will have USED bows on the rack.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    241

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    Go to your local archery shop and look at their used bows, bow technology has plateaued during the last roughly 10 yrs so any 'older' flagship model is more than capable. If you find one online such as archery talk or eBay do some research online about that particular model. Also don't overlook local classifieds sometimes you can find good deals there as well

  12. #12

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    Archery talk has an awesome selection, unfortunately they just put a 20 post minimum in to view their classifieds section.

    Well worth it to build the posts though imo. I have a friend who is left handed with a 31" draw who was having trouble finding a used bow to fit him. I just found a 2016 bowtech for a screaming deal on archery talk.

    You wont go wrong with any of the major brands. Shoot as many as you can in your price range and decide what feels right to you.

  13. Default

    I was in a similar situation about 4 years ago. I could have stretched and bought a $500 bow set up, but I was new to archery and new to archery hunting, so I decided to go super cheap and got a 20 year old bow on Craigslist that came with a release and a quiver and about 24 arrows for $80.

    I spent 2 seasons with that bow and while I was unsuccessful hunting with it, I realized I enjoyed the sport well enough that it was worth investing in a better bow. I had learned a ton about archery hunting and bows that I didn't know two years before and as luck would have it I was able to afford much more bow since I had saved up for 2.5 years. Plus I was able to sell my old bow to a buddy who was just getting into the sport of $80.

    Not sure if my experience matches up with where you are in your hunting/archery experience, but my advice would be to go as cheaply as possible while you are learning about the sport and then save up for when you really know what you want. I would also echo the other comments about trying out bows. They all feel different. If you're going to spend the money you had better enjoy shooting it.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Western Montana
    Posts
    104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBenHoyle View Post
    I was in a similar situation about 4 years ago. I could have stretched and bought a $500 bow set up, but I was new to archery and new to archery hunting, so I decided to go super cheap and got a 20 year old bow on Craigslist that came with a release and a quiver and about 24 arrows for $80.

    I spent 2 seasons with that bow and while I was unsuccessful hunting with it, I realized I enjoyed the sport well enough that it was worth investing in a better bow. I had learned a ton about archery hunting and bows that I didn't know two years before and as luck would have it I was able to afford much more bow since I had saved up for 2.5 years. Plus I was able to sell my old bow to a buddy who was just getting into the sport of $80.

    Not sure if my experience matches up with where you are in your hunting/archery experience, but my advice would be to go as cheaply as possible while you are learning about the sport and then save up for when you really know what you want. I would also echo the other comments about trying out bows. They all feel different. If you're going to spend the money you had better enjoy shooting it.
    I'm a new hunter in the market for a bow and have no idea what I'm looking for, I appreciate this advice.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Bixby Oklahoma
    Posts
    313

    Default

    Used is the way to go IMO but new ready to hunt packages are pretty hard to beat especially on the lower end of the price spectrum. One of the folks above is correct in that technology is only incrementally improving in the archery world. A foot or two per second speed and a decibel quieter is the common difference from one year model to the next. However, be careful buying bows on CL or FB. Some of them may be damaged to a point of dangerous. If you find one on FB or CL, take them to an archery shop to have it inspected. Most shops will do this for a small fee.

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