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  1. #51
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Helena, MT
    Posts
    433

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    Quote Originally Posted by onpoint View Post
    "With all that said I still end up buying some Ribeye steaks a few times a year even though they are full of hormones and steroids"!
    I wonder what portion of people responding with their lists of favorite game also regularly/sometimes buy and consume beef, poultry, and pork.
    I haven't bought a beefsteak nor hamburger in a store since the early nineties. My wife has bought home pork a few times in that time period - after eating it I felt like crap. We do eat chicken thighs now and again.
    Wild critter meat occupies 99% of the space in our freezer. Usually 100%.
    The cat/bear/waterfowl hunters and consumers will get no competition from me...………..
    onpoint,
    We don't eat a ton of beef or pork but I will tell you that what I do eat I don't get from the grocery store. Pork especially. I buy 1/2 hog from a local farmer every couple years. It is not the same meat as you get in a grocery store. If I eat beef I usually get some steaks from a non hunting friend who buys beef from the same farmer. Good stuff. (also I grew up on a farm/ranch back in day. I have great memories of raising, butchering, and processing our own meat).

    Wild game does make up the largest portion of the red meat we eat now. Moose is my favorite (have only taken one. It was really good) followed by antelope, elk and deer. Have eaten some beaver and bear and really enjoyed that as well.

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    Stone sheep back straps, moose!

  3. #53

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    Grouse
    Bear
    Elk
    Deer
    I believe bear would be higher on people's list, but it extremely important to get it field dressed and in a cooler immediately. We use beef for chille and save the bear for burgers on the grill.

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    Hog
    Nilgai
    Axis deer

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,450

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    I've got enough space to raise a few domestic critters at my place. If I didn't hunt I'd probably have a small hobby farm thing going. We raised cattle when I was a kid, mostly bottle fed steers. I never have trouble getting enough wild game for our freezer though, so it's not worth the time and financial commitment to me to raise anything.

    We do buy chicken at the grocery store. Processed meats for sandwiches/etc. If I haven't killed any boar we occasionally buy pork loin or sausage.

    As far as red meat, I enjoy a well grilled steak at Texas Roadhouse or the like when we're out on the town. I've never had to buy it to stock the freezer though.

    A co-worker of mine buys a quarter beef from a local farmer each year, grass fed/no hormone treatments, all that. When he told me how much he pays for that beef, I feel a whole lot better about spending $300 on a cow elk tag.

  6. #56

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    ^^^ Not sure what he pays, but a friend of my sells grass fed beef, whole, quarter, or half for $5/lb. Unfortunately I bought my 1/4 before hunting season assuming that I wouldn’t be quite so successful. That made my elk a little cheaper per pound and my out of state mule deer quite a bit more expensive. It would be much different if I wasn’t out of state.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Timberville, VA
    Posts
    2,146

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImBillT View Post
    ^^^ Not sure what he pays, but a friend of my sells grass fed beef, whole, quarter, or half for $5/lb. Unfortunately I bought my 1/4 before hunting season assuming that I wouldn’t be quite so successful. That made my elk a little cheaper per pound and my out of state mule deer quite a bit more expensive. It would be much different if I wasn’t out of state.
    Bought, cut and wrapped our beef is currently costing us about $1.80 per finished product. That's cheap enough for burger much less steaks and roasts. All I have to do is pick him/her out and haul her. I usually try to find another person so I only have to handle half at a time.
    Self proclaimed Founder, President, and Spiritual Leader of the I.S.V.F......Introduce Speedgoats to Virginia Foundation

  8. #58

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    Moose
    Antelope
    Elk
    Fish (I love to eat fish in general. Too many to list separately)
    Crane
    Swan
    Dove
    Quail
    Whitetail
    Frog legs
    Alligator
    Mallard (from Canada)
    Rattle Snake
    escargot

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by VAspeedgoat View Post
    Bought, cut and wrapped our beef is currently costing us about $1.80 per finished product. That's cheap enough for burger much less steaks and roasts. All I have to do is pick him/her out and haul her. I usually try to find another person so I only have to handle half at a time.
    That’s a heck of a price! I wouldn’t really want more than a quarter though. I get enough game every year that a quarter would be about the most I would want. This year however, I put 468lbs in the freezer in deer and elk alone. I doubt We’ll eat nearly that much.

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    In the middle
    Posts
    1,241

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    Swan has come up several times. Is it really any different than a Canada goose? I should think we are not terribly far off from having a Trumpeter Swan season here. Damn, they are big!

  11. #61

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    ^^^ That’s a good question! Crane a duck are quite a bit different from goose, so it’s certainly possible, but they’re also feeding differently.

    I forgot to mention coots until I saw it in someone’s post. It was near the bottom for them. Personally I love coots. I put them right under crane, which was quite high one my list. I’ve only had them twice, and only ate the breast. Just plopped them on the grill and ate them rare. The first time I was told not shoot them because “they’re nasty”. After asking around, no one there had ever actually eaten one. They are related to cranes, so I figured grilling the breasts rare with a little steak seasoning was the way to go. It was quite tasty. Coot and crane are pretty close to beef.

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Muley Junction, Arizona
    Posts
    99

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    I haven't eaten much western game, but I grew up on venison, ducks and small game back in NY.
    My list:
    Elk
    Teal - Really tied for 1st with Elk
    Wood Duck
    Antelope
    Wigeon
    Ruffed Grouse
    Whitetail
    Mallard
    Goose - Either Canada or a Snow shot in the fall
    Moose - Only ate it 2x, once in a burger in VT that was horrible, and again in ID in enchiladas so no good basis for how it tastes straight
    "Hitting a dove is simple. So is walking a tight wire or lifting a refrigerator. It's the execution that gets you" - Charley Waterman

  13. #63

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    Moose has been my favorite so far. But, I echo some of the mixed reviews with many of the deer I've eaten. Field care and diet obviously play a role. But, I wonder if genetics from region to region have anything to do with it? I'll definitely agree with the fans of alfalfa fed deer; but have had some off federal land that were almost as good.

    I don't really hunt ducks and geese; but had a question for you waterfowl enthusiasts: Is it possible to salvage any type of fois gras from wild birds??? I really like to order it in restaurants and wondered if it might be worth trying on some wild species down the road.

  14. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrentD View Post
    Swan has come up several times. Is it really any different than a Canada goose? I should think we are not terribly far off from having a Trumpeter Swan season here. Damn, they are big!
    I cooked a tundra swan for my family, and most if all of them don't like duck, they all asked what is was and when I told them it was swan they were amazed. They all enjoyed it.

  15. #65

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    Fois Gras ducks are force fed until they have a fatty liver if I’m not mistaken. If you like liver, you might still like duck liver, but I wouldn’t know. I’ve never had either. I’m not a fan of chicken liver, dove liver or crane liver, so I haven’t branched out beyond that.

    I wonder the same thing about deer. My whitetails have never tasted as good as mule deer, but the whitetails were eating on oat fields and hitting people deer feeders, so I would have thought they would be as good as a whitetail could get. The muledeer have been eating cotton, wheat, and/or whatever grasses and forbs they eat naturally. Honestly, the cotton mulie was the tastiest.

  16. #66

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    Axis deer by far, closely followed by elk.

  17. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltdann View Post
    Axis deer by far, closely followed by elk.
    Hahaha

  18. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltdann View Post
    Axis deer by far, closely followed by elk.
    I've heard that same comparison ranking.

  19. #69
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Muley Junction, Arizona
    Posts
    99

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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwhitebuffalo View Post
    Moose has been my favorite so far. But, I echo some of the mixed reviews with many of the deer I've eaten. Field care and diet obviously play a role. But, I wonder if genetics from region to region have anything to do with it? I'll definitely agree with the fans of alfalfa fed deer; but have had some off federal land that were almost as good.

    I don't really hunt ducks and geese; but had a question for you waterfowl enthusiasts: Is it possible to salvage any type of fois gras from wild birds??? I really like to order it in restaurants and wondered if it might be worth trying on some wild species down the road.
    That depends entirely on what "Fois Gras" means
    "Hitting a dove is simple. So is walking a tight wire or lifting a refrigerator. It's the execution that gets you" - Charley Waterman

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Muley Junction, Arizona
    Posts
    99

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImBillT View Post
    Fois Gras ducks are force fed until they have a fatty liver if I’m not mistaken. If you like liver, you might still like duck liver, but I wouldn’t know. I’ve never had either. I’m not a fan of chicken liver, dove liver or crane liver, so I haven’t branched out beyond that.

    I wonder the same thing about deer. My whitetails have never tasted as good as mule deer, but the whitetails were eating on oat fields and hitting people deer feeders, so I would have thought they would be as good as a whitetail could get. The muledeer have been eating cotton, wheat, and/or whatever grasses and forbs they eat naturally. Honestly, the cotton mulie was the tastiest.
    With my limited background, I think whitetails taste better, but my only muley was a young doe (About 1.5 yrs old by her teeth) that I hit with my truck in ID. To me she ate like an older NY Whitetail buck, she was even tenderized at 55
    "Hitting a dove is simple. So is walking a tight wire or lifting a refrigerator. It's the execution that gets you" - Charley Waterman

  21. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    North Bay, California
    Posts
    31

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    I am a bit surprised at how low people are ranking salmon. Fresh caught salmon is one of my favorite things.

  22. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingBird View Post
    With my limited background, I think whitetails taste better, but my only muley was a young doe (About 1.5 yrs old by her teeth) that I hit with my truck in ID. To me she ate like an older NY Whitetail buck, she was even tenderized at 55
    A lot of others on the forum have put whitetails in front of muledeer, but the people I talk to around here that have eaten both usually prefer mule deer. I wonder if the different regions are making different tasting deer, or if they are making people with different preferences.

  23. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingBird View Post
    That depends entirely on what "Fois Gras" means
    I was just thinking goose liver. I personally can't take any other varieties (chicken, beef, etc.) wild or domestic. Never know if someone's got a good secret and I'm usually willing to try some new things.

    I forgot to include it in my other post, but you're absolutely right about the fresh salmon.

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    I wanted to thank everyone who contributed to this thread. Very interesting and varied taste buds among us.

    Someone ask what has been some of the strangest I was able and not able to eat

    Some items others consider strange, I grew up eating---rattlesnake, rocky mountain oysters, frog legs, but others came from our travels. I liked various things and dont remember them all, but do remember liking Termites and cane rats in Africa, Moose nose in Canada, Escargot in France, Turtle soup and oysters on the half shell in New Orleans was the first place I had them.

    Most of the stuff I would not eat was when we were in Asia. Rotten eggs, tuna eye balls, spiders, worms, Dog---In Australia I didn't like kangaroo and I was never drunk enough to eat the worm in the Tequila bottle in Mexico LOL
    Last edited by Europe; 01-11-2019 at 02:24 AM.

  25. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    In the middle
    Posts
    1,241

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    I liked the fermented trout in Norge, kangaroo in Australia, but did not care at all for the sea cucumbers of Taipei. I have not tried most of the more exotic things on your list though.

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