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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    South East Colorado
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    9,166

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    After seeing what a 6.5CM did to 2 elk I wouldn't hesitate to recommend one. Light recoil, flat shooting, lots of reloading component options...a great gun that will last your child through adulthood.
    I'm an addict...archery, rifles, shotguns, handguns, muzzleloaders, hunting, fishing, fly fishing..and I don't want rehab

  2. #27

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    Truckloads of elk have fallen to young hunters shooting the 243 here in Montana. Some old hunters, too.

    Maybe elk are tougher in other states..
    Oh give me a home with a low interest loan,
    a cowgirl and two pickup trucks.

    A color TV,
    all the beer should be free,
    and that, man, is Rancho Deluxe.

  3. #28

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    Thank you so much for the overwhelming responses! A lot of great advice in this thread.

    At this point I feel I am being swayed to the 7-08 over the 243.

    But I do have another question: out of the 243, 6.5, 7-08 which one has the superior ballistic coefficient? Or are they all pretty similar? Just curious.
    Last edited by JerichoBronco; 10-10-2018 at 07:56 PM.

  4. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by JerichoBronco View Post

    But I do have another question: out of the 243, 6.5, 7-08 which one has the superior ballistic coefficient? Or are they all pretty similar?
    BC isn't something to worry about in a youth rifle. mtmuley

  5. #30

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    6.5 is known for it's BC. In fact that's the reason for it's popularity. Again though, probably not a major factor I would concern myself with. All of these cartridges will shoot plenty far and flat for hunting purposes.
    Last edited by MJE2083; 10-10-2018 at 08:02 PM.

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Marquette Michigan
    Posts
    207

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    This might serve as a reference for you.Name:  IMG_20180109_223229338_LL.jpg
Views: 227
Size:  84.5 KB

  7. #32

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    How about the Howa mini action in 6.5 Grendel? A bit small for elk but should do the job on deer

  8. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtmuley View Post
    BC isn't something to worry about in a youth rifle. mtmuley
    yup! unless she's gonna be shooting 450, BC isn't much of a consideration! That being said, you aren't comparing apples to apples... a heavier .243 will have a higher BC than a light .284...but, the heavier .284's have a higher BC than all the .243's (everything else being equal of course). I use a 6.5x284 for lopes/deer/elk, love it, and have taken plenty of each with that caliber. that being said...my kids will both start with a .243

    Why not just get her the .243 and worry about it later if she does actually get an elk tag? start her easy at the range. It's not like you'd lose much money if you had to upgrade that rifle to a bigger one later on...plus...it's totally worth it to spoil your kid!

  9. #34

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    Lots of good responses here, but will throw in a few ideas.
    Here is Wisconsin, I know quite a few ladies that started hunting with a 270. Probably a little much, but I’d be curious how much a muzzlebreak (brake?) would help shooting a regular 130gr bullet.

    My wife got absolutely throttled by my old 20 gauge back when we were in the process of switching from shotgun-only to rifle, so to ease any apprehension toward shooting, I bought her a 25-06 A-bolt that already had a break on it. That gun is an absolute dream to shoot. It kicks less than my old 410 and 25-06 should have just a bit more oomph than the 243, though I don’t know that for fact, but I know that it puts an absolute whooping on deer. Bet a good non-lead bullet could handle elk at close range.

    Completely irrelevant to this conversation, my next rifle will be a 7mm-08. Everyone that has one loves them, and won’t be quite as mean as my 30-06 when I’m looking to fill some doe tags
    To see America as history, to conceive of destiny as a becoming, to smell a hickory tree through the still lapse of ages- all these things are possible for us, and to achieve them takes only the free sky, and the will to ply our wings~ Aldo Leopold

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    West Slope, CO
    Posts
    4,586

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    My boys all started with reduced .308 or 30-06 loads.

    My favorite daughter went with a 7-08 with 120 grain bullets.

    All kill deer and elk efficiently.

    At the range, double up on the hearing protection. Muzzle blast and noise account for a lot of the perceived recoil.

  11. Default

    I came here to post this same question for the same purpose and saw this thread. My wife is VERY recoil shy, and maybe even more so, muzzle blast sensitive. My oldest son will start hunting soon and is very small frame. We hunt mostly general season hunts near us in Idaho and the mule deer and elk seasons overlap, so they need one gun and one bullet that can do both since you can shoot whichever one steps out first.

    I've scoured the internet and researched everything....243 to 257 Roberts, 25-06, 260, 264, 7mm-08, 280, 6.5-284, 270, 6.5 cr, 6.5-06, a lot of wildcats and Ackley improved in-between....I think I've settled on the tried and true 7mm-08, 6.5 cr, or the 6.5-284 (I haven't reloaded but that one sounds like a fun one to start with). I dont want to hijack this thread, but I think the OP would be interested in this...

    The question is does the 6.5-284 have more recoil than a 7mm-08? If it does, then I will toss that one because I think 7mm-08 is the max gun I want to set my wife and son up on. My wife actually shot her first deer a couple of years ago with the Hornady custom lite 270win 120gr bullet. Preformed very well. But I wouldn't have her shoot that at an elk. Plus she needs her own rifle because the 270 is what I generally use. Gives an excuse to buy another rifle.
    Last edited by livetooextreme; 10-27-2018 at 12:45 PM.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Wherever the bugles are
    Posts
    830

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    Yes the 6.5-284 will have more recoil.

  13. Default

    Both of my boys started with a .308. They practiced with reduced recoil loads and when they were hunting they used regular ammo. Once they were shooting at an animal, they never felt the recoil.
    Last edited by gtaggart; 10-27-2018 at 01:21 PM.

  14. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by JerichoBronco View Post
    Thank you so much for the overwhelming responses! A lot of great advice in this thread.

    At this point I feel I am being swayed to the 7-08 over the 243.

    But I do have another question: out of the 243, 6.5, 7-08 which one has the superior ballistic coefficient? Or are they all pretty similar? Just curious.
    Depends on the bullet, but they’re both close. For same weight bullets the smaller caliber will have better BC’s. A .243 can be loaded with a 115-120gr bucket with a higher BC than the 120gr 6.5, but the 140hr 6.5’s have a higher BC than the 120gr 6mms. The 7mm 140s have a lower BC than the 6.5mm 140s, but you can go all the way up to a 190gr bullet in 7mm and it has a much higher BC than any 6.5. Factory twist rates in the 7-08 don’t allow the heaviest bullets though. A 7mm 168 has a similar BC to the 140’s from a 6.5.

    What it really boils down to is are you interested in handload, and do you want a gun that will push heavier bullets one day when she is ready? The 7-08 will push a 140gr bullet faster than the 6.5CM and at normal ranges BC doesn’t even matter. On top of that it will shoot 168s very well. For low recoil, you can even shoot a 120gr ballistic tip hunting at deer and for practice. For lots of factory ammo in the 120-140gr range, you might lean toward the 6.5CM. The 7-08 is a little more versatile of hunting cartridge though if you don’t mind hand loading because you can find hunting bullets from 120gr up to 190. With a 10 or 9.5 twist you’ll be limited to something in the 168-175gr range at the top. With an 8.5 or 9 you can shoot just about any bullet out there.

    I have a .243 and have used on mule deer with success. It’s a nice little rifle. However, Most would recommend using a 105-120gr bullet deer or elk. If you do that, the recoil will be very similar to the 6.5 CM or 7-08 with a 120, but that will be as heavy as you can ever go and barrel life is shorter in the smaller bore, so if she gets pelenty if practice you could loose some accuracy over the years. I would choose the 7-8, but the 6.5 CM would an excellent choice as well. On the secondary market you could probably pick up a .269 Rem for a good price. It’s everything the 6.5CM is but because it isn’t the new kid on the block they’re not as popular.

  15. #40

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    My daughter killed her first deer with a rifle when she was 7. I loaded 100grn nosler partitions in a rem model 7 in 260 down to about 2300fps. The one thing I think helps kids when shooting a rifle that has recoil when the child is smaller is a comb extension depending on the gun. I bought a rubber comb that attaches with a Velcro strap and raises the comb up about and inch and it keeps the kids smaller face on the stock and aids in better alignment with the scope. Also helps prevent the head from floating on recoil and helps stop the scope from hitting them. Just think it really helps them shoot better and more comfortable and find the target faster.
    " You know what Jim Bridger said about the Indians. Just when your not seeing any is about the time they are fixing to get the thickest!"

  16. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImBillT View Post
    Depends on the bullet, but theyíre both close. For same weight bullets the smaller caliber will have better BCís. A .243 can be loaded with a 115-120gr bucket with a higher BC than the 120gr 6.5, but the 140hr 6.5ís have a higher BC than the 120gr 6mms. The 7mm 140s have a lower BC than the 6.5mm 140s, but you can go all the way up to a 190gr bullet in 7mm and it has a much higher BC than any 6.5. Factory twist rates in the 7-08 donít allow the heaviest bullets though. A 7mm 168 has a similar BC to the 140ís from a 6.5.

    What it really boils down to is are you interested in handload, and do you want a gun that will push heavier bullets one day when she is ready? The 7-08 will push a 140gr bullet faster than the 6.5CM and at normal ranges BC doesnít even matter. On top of that it will shoot 168s very well. For low recoil, you can even shoot a 120gr ballistic tip hunting at deer and for practice. For lots of factory ammo in the 120-140gr range, you might lean toward the 6.5CM. The 7-08 is a little more versatile of hunting cartridge though if you donít mind hand loading because you can find hunting bullets from 120gr up to 190. With a 10 or 9.5 twist youíll be limited to something in the 168-175gr range at the top. With an 8.5 or 9 you can shoot just about any bullet out there.

    I have a .243 and have used on mule deer with success. Itís a nice little rifle. However, Most would recommend using a 105-120gr bullet deer or elk. If you do that, the recoil will be very similar to the 6.5 CM or 7-08 with a 120, but that will be as heavy as you can ever go and barrel life is shorter in the smaller bore, so if she gets pelenty if practice you could loose some accuracy over the years. I would choose the 7-8, but the 6.5 CM would an excellent choice as well. On the secondary market you could probably pick up a .269 Rem for a good price. Itís everything the 6.5CM is but because it isnít the new kid on the block theyíre not as popular.
    I agree with the heavy (but not too heavy) bullet per cartridge concept. This is why I shoot 180 in my .308. If I wanted 150 gr, I'd be better off with a 270. Even the 165 gr only gives me 80 fps more velocity and 1/3 inch less drop at 300 yards with 200 yd zero. Not to mention less energy at the muzzle, even less down range due to bc and momentum, and slightly more wind drift.

    Not that any of this really matters in real life, but if you gotta choose 1...
    Last edited by shaffe48; 11-02-2018 at 12:21 PM.

  17. Default

    Just though. Why would you put an 11 yr old girl in for an elk tag in the first place? Sounds like her first year hunting and she's looking at an elk tag? Why not take her to Africa for the big five or maybe you could get her a Brown bear tag in Alaska! She's only 11 yrs old!

  18. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Fischer View Post
    Just though. Why would you put an 11 yr old girl in for an elk tag in the first place? Sounds like her first year hunting and she's looking at an elk tag? Why not take her to Africa for the big five or maybe you could get her a Brown bear tag in Alaska! She's only 11 yrs old!
    Well if they are in the state you live in or nearby then why not I guess? In michigan inwas able to hunt deer around thensame age...along with rabbits.

    But I made a similar post about the gun. If the concern is to spend money on a gun that she will outgrow then buy a cheaper but quality alternative.

  19. #44

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    I think your original plan is perfect. I'd have no problem letting my boys go after elk with a 243. Bullets matter more than headstamps.

  20. #45

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    Something to consider. All tikka t3 stocks are interchangeable. So I just purchased two tikka's for my son. We are sticking with deer, so I started on the lower end, but the same idea could apply to you. I bought a 223 and the .243 youth tikka. We have already shot 100's of rounds through that 223. Easy cheap and he is learning all the basics with very little recoil. As the season approaches we move the youth stock over to the 243.

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