Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. Default Bipod vs shooting sticks

    Looking to purchase a 12"-23" expandable bipods or shooting sticks for the wife and kids' .243. The wife, my 12 yr old son, and 10 yr old daughter are just starting to hunt. We hunt coulees, farm fields, stubble fields primarily. Need something to get them higher off the ground while still providing solid platform for these beginner shooters. What are your pros/cons of each and brand suggestions.

  2. Default

    I gave up on bipods and shooting sticks about five years ago in favor of trekking poles. Super adjustable and i find them more stable and sturdy than your standard harris-type bipod (and certainly more so than factory shooting sticks). Loop the wrist straps over the ends of the handles and you have a nice soft cradle for the forearm. Plenty sturdy to really lean into (load) them. I shot my bull this year off of trekking poles extended to their full height, which was much better than the only other available alternative (which would have been unsupported standing). Never really worry about the low-prone position, in the rare times that shot is feasible, whatever pack I have on hand is sufficient and then bino harness for a rear support. Good luck, hopefully you find the right system that helps your new hunters feel confident in their shots!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Bitterroot Valley, MT
    Posts
    1,808
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I run a low bipod, 10" or so. If I need more than that I have a Triggerstick tripod that I like a great deal. If I am higher than prone, I greatly prefer three legs to two.
    "There are no words that can tell the hidden spirit of the wilderness, that can reveal its mystery, its melancholy, and its charm." ~TR

    "He was a mighty hunter before the Lord." ~Genesis 10:9

  4. #4

    Default

    I have just been using a couple of 4' long wood dowels (I think they're approx an inch dia) lashed together, slide the knot up or down for height, for my kids to shoot off of. Very sturdy and I just carry them and we can use them sitting still or stalk. For myself I prefer to carry my rifle in hand so never have gotten into the poles or such but I can see they can be useful, I do have some folding sticks I'll take for calling and sitting for instance, never have liked bi-pods in this uneven ground.

  5. Default

    I like my Vanguard

  6. #6

    Default

    I started using trekking poles as shooting sticks also. Figured out how long they need to be for a given position and made marks. I'm sufficiently stable out to 300yd on them.
    Life is too short for stupid dogs and ugly guns.

  7. #7

    Default

    If you shoot prone a lot, it's hard to beat the bipod. I have both depending on the country I'm hunting. Why not have both?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Southwest Florida
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Im giving treking poles a try this year. I been using either a monopod walking stick with a yoke on the top for 15 years for woods hunting and shooting sticks with two legs and a yoke for more open or places were I might get a longer shot. I dont know if the treking poles will provide a better rest or not but maybe they will help me not fall down as much. Im getting tired of picking my big arse up after a face plant.

  9. #9

    Default

    I brought mid-long bipods, tripod shooting sticks and walking sticks on my recent 'lope hunt. They never left the truck. I did my shooting from a sitting position off my MR frame. I find it handy, stable and one less gadget to mess with.
    "Freedom is NOT Free"

  10. Default

    I tried bi-pod and shooting stick's and didn't like either one. For me, steady shooting in the field require's the use of a Military or Whelan sling and knowing how to use it. The bi-pod and stick's simply were not steady enough for me. I've still got the sticks. If your out sitting on the ground, they make a great place to place your rifle!

  11. #11

    Default

    Name:  125939B1-05DE-4484-82FB-98A166337D61.jpg
Views: 325
Size:  68.8 KB
    I use this as well as my grandkids. It works sitting or standing. They like it more so than sticks. It attaches to a regular camera or spotting scope tripod. Only problem I think you may have with one of these is getting one to fit your 12” range. Caldwell makes a cradle that is adjustable, it may better suit your needs.

  12. #12

    Default

    While I like and use trekking poles set up as Carlin59 suggested, when kids enter the equation, I think something like the Primos Triggerstick tripod works very well. My 8 year old daughter impressed me shooting a half gallon milk jug at 100 yds standing behind the Triggerstick.

  13. #13

    Default

    I tried bi-pod and shooting stick's and didn't like either one. For me, steady shooting in the field require's the use of a Military or Whelan sling and knowing how to use it. The bi-pod and stick's simply were not steady enough for me. I've still got the sticks. If your out sitting on the ground, they make a great place to place your rifle!
    Hallelujah! I was starting to think I was the only guy left still using a shooting sling. Many years back, though, I switched from the USGI 1907 sling to a Ching Sling from Langlois Leather. It requires a third sling swivel stud amidships, but loop up is almost instantaneous. Doesn't stay locked high up on your arm for long strings of slow fire as well, but in hunting it's the first shot that really counts. Sling shooting does take learning and practice, though. The RWVA Appleseed program teaches sling shooting very well. My longest shot was on an antelope somewhere a little past 400 yards from the sitting with the USGI sling.

    Works for me but not for my wife, who is small and short of arm. She absolutely loves the shooting sticks I got her many years back, and another pair was of great help to a 13-year-old boy we took along on his first (successful) deer hunt last year. Wife and I both tried bipods in the past and we just never did get to liking them. It's more about whatever the individual in question is most comfortable using and gets the best results with.
    "The most terrifying sound in nature is not the roar of a charging lion nor the whistle of a descending bomb; rather it is a click when you expected a bang"- Peter Hathaway Capstick

  14. #14

    Default

    I try to minimize what I have to carry. I use trekking poles. I cross them to use for shooting sticks. I also use them hang the quarters to make it easier to de-bone the animal.

  15. #15

    Default

    I carry 2 Harris swivel bipods 9-13 & 13-27 with Morse spiked feet and a shooting sling
    "Any fool can create a program that is so demanding that it would virtually kill the toughest Marine or hardiest of elite athletes, but not any fool can create a tough program that produces progress without unnecessary pain.” ~ Dr. Mel C. Siff

  16. Default

    I like sticks over bipod. Now that I’ve started using trekking poles, I will have to try them in place of sticks.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Rio Verde, Wyoming
    Posts
    430

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy Warrior View Post
    Looking to purchase a 12"-23" expandable bipods or shooting sticks for the wife and kids' .243. The wife, my 12 yr old son, and 10 yr old daughter are just starting to hunt. We hunt coulees, farm fields, stubble fields primarily. Need something to get them higher off the ground while still providing solid platform for these beginner shooters. What are your pros/cons of each and brand suggestions.
    It depends on the situation.

    For Antelope, I run a tall Harris all of the time. Extend the legs out all the way and shoot from the sitting position.

    For Deer, if I am hiking in a ways, I will just use the pack.

    If I am hunting relatively close to the road, then I will have have the tall harris on.

    For elk, I rarely run a bipod.

    Granted, I try to shoot 300 yards and in.
    “This is a very complicated case Maude. You know, a lot of ins, a lot of outs, lot of what have yous.” - The Dude

    “This aggression will not stand, man.” - The Dude

  18. #18

    Default

    Rugged Ridge makes a very nice Bi-pod. If you install pic rails on the stocks of all your guns, you can use this very nice bi-pod on all your guns and still run a sling if you want. Check out their website. Great customer service in Redmond, OR. They make leg extensions that install quickly in the field if needed

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •