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  1. #1

    Default Long Trip Trailer Options - 6x12 Single Semi-Round Nose vs. 7x16 Tandem V Nose

    I hope everyone already hunting are having success and those of you preparing to hunt are getting excited! Good luck this season!

    Question, my buddies and I are driving from Indiana to Montana in November to hunt a combo tag. We have a 2011 F-250 Diesel Supercrew we are taking. It is slightly modified and has gobs of power and plenty to spare.

    We are also planning on pulling an enclosed trailer and have two options:
    - 6x12 Single Axle with a Semi-Round Nose and approx 6ft ceiling height
    - 7x16 Tandem Axle with a V Nose and approx 7ft ceiling height

    We are having a trouble deciding which to take. Both trailers are in good condition, have been properly serviced, and have new or newer high speed-rated trailer tires. We are driving interstates nearly the entire trip and are wanting to drive interstate speeds. I understand that speed is the enemy when it comes to towing, but 60MPH isn't an option.

    How much of a MPG difference should we expect between these two trailers? I am sure the 6x12 will pull easier than the 7x16, but are we talking 1MP difference or more like 3-4MPG? I have read that the tandem trailers tend to pull, track, and ride better and are safer in a theoretical blowout situation, but is all of that really that big of a deal?

    Which would you take and why?

  2. Default

    You will see no real difference in fuel mileage between the two trailers.
    I would rather have four tires than two it will pull better and some security in case of a blowout

  3. #3

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    Take the tandem. More stable at freeway speed. And that truck ain't gonna notice a difference in mpg between those little trailers. mtmuley

  4. #4

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    Minimal MPG difference, 4 is better than 2 and more room. Take the tandem
    Even if you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Seeley Lake, Mt
    Posts
    542

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    Tandem is more stable at higher speeds plus more storage is always good.

    Dan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in the basalt rocks
    Posts
    5,195

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    Tandem with out question. A blowout with a tandem is MUCH less exciting than a single, especially at freeway speeds.
    Fear the beard....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Bixby Oklahoma
    Posts
    285

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    I have two enclosed trailers close to your specs. mpg difference was significant in a very similar setting not due to the axles but due to the height and weight. V nose should help. However, risk of blowout is real and I would opt for the dual axle. Fuel cost may be more but it sounds as if you are splitting that anyway.

    Be sure to repack the bearings and check the tires before heading off.

  8. #8

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    Thank you so much everyone! I appreciate the feedback and support.

    Rzrbck918 - is the MPG difference around 2MPG or more? I have been doing some research and am curious to hear real world experiences.

  9. #9

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    I had a 2011 Super Duty diesel (2016 Now). The MPG won't change much between the two trailers. I have also pulled tandem axle enclosed trailers many tens of thousands miles on hunting trips. At highway speeds and the windy conditions in the west, you will definitely want the tandem for tracking and stability. Run the tires at max pressure and service your bearings. I would also suggest a spare tire and spare hub assembly with proper tools. I also carry a floor jack and solid 4-way lug wrench.

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JLS View Post
    Tandem with out question. A blowout with a tandem is MUCH less exciting than a single, especially at freeway speeds.
    I second this.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Richardton, ND
    Posts
    196

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    Like said i would stick with the tandem axle. Also said before make sure you bring good tools for possible repairs. Rather have them in the way moving them around then not having the right stuff if needed. Good luck and have a safe trip.

  12. #12

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    Well I am the only one for the single axel. Less moving parts over the course of a lot of miles.
    Towed trailers all over the country while racing. I liked the single because of less weight and moving friction.
    Usually shorter so turn around is easier in space. If you are challenged when backing up a trailer the tandem will be easier.
    If you will end up on a mountain road somewhere you will like the single.
    Had flats but never a blow out. Always carried more than one spare and axel assembly.
    Always serviced the trailer before the next trip (grease and check bearings, anti-sieze the lugs). Make sure you can tear it apart and fix in the dark.
    Murphy always shows up at night.
    If you count on one of those 4 pronged tire iron to handle the lugs you should leave the trailer home. Get a couple hard case sockets that specifically fit the lugs on
    the trailer. Same for the truck for that matter. ( you always seem to lose one). And a heavy duty ratchet w/ a breaker bar.

    the boys are right. The tandem will track better and you won't have a rodeo w/ a blowout. sound like your rig can handle the weight.
    so towing in a cross wind will be less exciting. You will hit your head on the ceiling less w/ 7 ft ceiling.
    My experience was the taller trailers cost us 1-2 mpg.
    Good luck
    Last edited by Tradewind; 09-13-2018 at 11:29 AM.

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    If you take a tandem. Get some 2x6s screw together with the side cut on an angle makings a ramp or they sell a ramp to change a tire. Just put it under the good tire and pull up or backup. No jack needed and can get you off the side of the road quick. I stage my battery impact, tire and ramp at the front door. Just remember that depending on the trailer tire 65mph is its rating.

  14. #14

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    Thanks again everyone. In reading these comments I see an awful lot of comments regarding blowouts. Are you all just good scouts and are "always prepared" or is a blowout/flat something I am likely to experience?

    Both trailers are equipped with new or newer Carlise high speed HD tires with a D load rating. They are speed rated for 85MPH and are all in great shape.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by shannerdrake View Post
    Thanks again everyone. In reading these comments I see an awful lot of comments regarding blowouts. Are you all just good scouts and are "always prepared" or is a blowout/flat something I am likely to experience?

    Both trailers are equipped with new or newer Carlise high speed HD tires with a D load rating. They are speed rated for 85MPH and are all in great shape.

    Blowouts are rare. However, one night i did hit trailer jack someone dropped in the road and it bent a lot of stuff. Trailers do not have the suspension that a vehicle does. People tend not to recognize this.
    A trailer will not handle contact with a pothole or something laying in the road while going 70 mph. the tire and axel will take most of it and something usually gives. It becomes the case that a single axel is much
    easier to fix, and less involved,on the road than a tandem where the wheels and suspension are generally using the same leaf spring (s). The tandem usually are much heavier and we tend to put more stuff in them. So they hit
    harder on whatever obstacle you manage to find in the road

    If you do not hit any thing then you will not have any worries and will have a incident free trip/travel.

    I got to the point where I brot along a extra axel and assembly cheap insurance in the middle of the night. We used to have a tire distributor who used to tell the knuckleheads that showed up with tales of woe that "you need to be able to field strip your transporter, or probably stay home".

    I wish you well on your trip and may you have safe travels
    Last edited by Tradewind; 09-13-2018 at 04:02 PM.

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    Overloaded and under/over inflated tires blow a lot. Just check your tire sidwalls when you stop for heat and check your pressure every 500m or so when you get gas. It only takes a minute and can save you from being on side the road.

  17. #17

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    There’s a lot of good advice here. I would take the tandem. They trail better and don’t seem to bounce around as much. The tandem will be better in rough road conditions with ruts and rocks. Mine seemed to walk right through the ruts with one tire down and one floating over the rut. Hope you have a good trip and don’t worry about a little extra fuel. I have a stock 16’ f250 diesel I got 14-15 mpg Wisconsin to Colorado.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Lake of the ozarks Missouri
    Posts
    1,626

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    I’ve towed a single axel trailer hunting in Wyoming twice. It seems to do well and I like it for crossing ditches and stuff. As to your question of blowouts both times I have blown a tire. Once in Wyoming and once an hour into the trip. You just never know. Be prepared!!
    I work so I can hunt

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