Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 31 of 31
  1. #26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UT_Hunter View Post
    Hey all got a question for all you reloaders out there. I've been working up some loads for my 300 win mag trying to get at least 1 inch group at 100 yards never been able to do that with the factory ammo I used. So far I've tried 180 gr and 165gr hornady sst bullets with IMR 4350 each loaded with variaying 60s and 70s grains of powder based on the reloading manual, couldn't get a group tighter than 2 inches with those. So I switched to 165gr nosler accubonds bullets and loaded those with RL 22 with loads in the upper 70 grains of powder still nothing better than 2 inches, I did try the nosler 165gr accubonds bullets with the IMR 4350 but those grouped awful. I'm curious to know what you guys think I should do next try another bullet? heard good things about bergers but they are expensive and i don't want to keep buying bullets if there's a better way to find accuracy or should I switch around with different powders, seating depth ect? Or any other suggestions I'm really new when it comes to reloading and the process of finding a accurate load so any advice is appreciated thanks.
    Why are you using 4350 in a .300 Win mag? Try 7828 or even IMR 7977 or something slower than IMR4350.

  2. #27

    Default

    I had good success with H1000 and 180 grain bullets of several makes. I would suspect shooter error or bedding problems. Is there any pattern to the groups? Horizontal stringing? Vertical? Random?

  3. Default

    I
    ve never owned a 300 mag, shot a few but never owned! But I think I'd definately dump any bullet under 180gr and for myselfeverything under 200gr. That 300 mag is one powerful cartridge and the 165gr bullet I would think may hit like bomb's. Most people I read like the 180gr bullet in their 300 mag but I still believe that the 200gr is the way to go. The 300 can handle that bullet a lot better than a 30-06 can and the 30-06 handles the 180gr fine. my though is to get the most I can out of a cartridge, not just a lot of velocity. After all, your putting up with a lot of recoil just to do about what you can otherwise do with a 30-06!

  4. #29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Fischer View Post
    I
    ve never owned a 300 mag, shot a few but never owned! But I think I'd definately dump any bullet under 180gr and for myselfeverything under 200gr. That 300 mag is one powerful cartridge and the 165gr bullet I would think may hit like bomb's. Most people I read like the 180gr bullet in their 300 mag but I still believe that the 200gr is the way to go. The 300 can handle that bullet a lot better than a 30-06 can and the 30-06 handles the 180gr fine. my though is to get the most I can out of a cartridge, not just a lot of velocity. After all, your putting up with a lot of recoil just to do about what you can otherwise do with a 30-06!
    My shoulder hurts just watching people shoot that big stuff.

  5. #30

    Default

    Not everyone can shoot a big magnum accurately. But loading for a magnum can be a little finacky also. The bullet seating depth is usually high on the list of the things to play with.
    The mags can like to have powder charges in the upper end of the capacity too.
    I haven't seen a .300 win mag that doesn't like reloader 22 and 180gr accubonds.
    I use a loading of 77 gr. Of 22 with 180s in my rifle and the same load has worked well for several of my friends.
    Most factory .300s are a 1 in 10 twist. That rate of twist likes 180 and heavier bullets, but 165gr isn't too light for good accuracies.
    What make of gun is yours?
    Alot of mags out there are not good shooters without some bedding work and maybe even a stock replacement.
    I feel a .300 win mag should always have at least a 24 inch barrel, but 26 is better for a more even and complete burn of the powder. The longer barrels help make the recoil more manageable also.
    If your magazine won't allow for long seating of the bullet within 20 thousands or less from the rifling, then a crimp die would help keep pressure more even and aid accuracy

  6. #31

    Default

    I guess you always want to be sure that is it the gun not shooting or is it the shooter not shooting.

    Do people decide on a certain bullet and say that I'm going to pick out a certain bullet brand, style and weight and say I'm going to make this work? How do you decide which powder to use? Generally I make sure that the cases I'm going to use will chamber in the rifle. Next I start to seat a bullet and increase seating depth until the loaded dummy round chambers without resistance or if there is resistance until the round extracts from the chamber with the bullet still seated and look for rifling marks on the bullet. As long as the round goes into the magazine I leave it at that or if too long I have to decide to relegate the rifle to single shot status if it shoots best that way.

    At some point you may decide to live with it being a so so shooter or sell it. I have no experience with a .300 Win mag, but I'd certainly look at slower powders.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •