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    Great info, Minnesota! I've actually got a lot of what you suggested.

    Boots - Danner East Ridge
    Binoculars - Steiner 10x42 Predators
    Pack - ALPS Outdoorz Extreme Commander X +
    22 - Ruger 10/22 Takedown

    Just iron sights on my 22 but that thing is fun to plink with. I just looked at the book you suggested and definitely want to check that out!

    I've researched a lot over the years of wanting to hunt and started to purchase gear suggested from people. I go out into the national forests here in AZ and do overnight camps quite often. Practice survival skills, shelter building, etc. I've read a lot of bushcraft books and that kind of thing. I'm excited to get to Montana to venture out. However, my compass and map reading skills are virtually non-existent. Haha - I've struggled with that one.

    -Matthew

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    Edit: Doubled posted and couldn't find the delete option!
    Last edited by BMB; 06-26-2018 at 05:23 PM.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gem Lake, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,120

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    Sounds like you are heading in the right direction! One other note I meant to add before. If you can't find a deer or elk tag available, black bear is OTC, and is a fun hunt up in the same country you will likely be hunting deer and elk next year.

    Have fun.
    “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.” - Jack London

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    Oh, wow. I had no idea you could just purchase a tag for bear. Great to know! Thanks again!

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    Also you can probably find reduced recoil loads for your .300 to practice and hunt deer with. IMO, your .300 is about as perfect an elk rifle as you can find IF you can manage it. The reduced recoil loads will nearly mirror .308 performance in your .300 Win Mag.

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    That's a great idea. I just looked up reduced recoil loads for it and Hornady popped right up with velocity and energy info. https://www.hornady.com/ammunition/r...custom-lite#!/

    You think that is still too much for a deer?

  7. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaHunter View Post
    Sounds like you are heading in the right direction! One other note I meant to add before. If you can't find a deer or elk tag available, black bear is OTC, and is a fun hunt up in the same country you will likely be hunting deer and elk next year.

    Have fun.
    Not sure I would want my first hunt to involve shooting at something that can bite back. In my view, start with birds, small game or deer.
    "Freedom is NOT Free"

  8. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMB View Post
    That's a great idea. I just looked up reduced recoil loads for it and Hornady popped right up with velocity and energy info. https://www.hornady.com/ammunition/r...custom-lite#!/

    You think that is still too much for a deer?
    It's not about too much or too little for the deer, it is about concern of it being too much for the hunter, particularly an inexperienced one. For an experienced hunter standard 300wm rounds are fine (even if over kill) - the advantage suggested is about lowering felt recoil of the shooter. For example, if you were starting without a gun, you would have been well served starting with a .243Win, 25-06Rem, 6.5 creedmoor (known as 6.5 man-bun on this forum) or 7mm08Rem (know as 7mmHT on this forum as it has a very loyal fanbase here) or a number of other low-ish recoil rounds that are perfect for deer and antelope (and from 25-06 up, are also good for black bear and elk).
    "Freedom is NOT Free"

  9. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Martin View Post
    Also you can probably find reduced recoil loads for your .300 to practice and hunt deer with. IMO, your .300 is about as perfect an elk rifle as you can find IF you can manage it. The reduced recoil loads will nearly mirror .308 performance in your .300 Win Mag.
    Yep. Don't listen to the "you need a 7-08 or .308" crowd. You have a great rifle for killing anything in Montana. Unless you can't accurately handle it, then consider another cartridge. mtmuley

  10. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by VikingsGuy View Post
    Not sure I would want my first hunt to involve shooting at something that can bite back. In my view, start with birds, small game or deer.
    Black bears aren't that scary. It's a fun hunt here in Montana. Go for it. mtmuley

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    1,703

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    Welcome, there is some good advice in this thread. Is never to late to start, just remember it’s meant to be fun. There are a lot of other things in life to be hardcore on. Lots of critters have died and hunters have smiled in grip in grins wearing blue jeans and an old rifle.

    I got caught up in the latest and greatest and your .300 will make them just as dead with a lot more money left in your pocket.

  12. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtmuley View Post
    Black bears aren't that scary. It's a fun hunt here in Montana. Go for it. mtmuley
    Definitely not grizzlies, but they kill 1 or 2 folks a year, so I stand by my earlier comment - not ideal prey for first hunt.
    "Freedom is NOT Free"

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gem Lake, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,120

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    Quote Originally Posted by VikingsGuy View Post
    Definitely not grizzlies, but they kill 1 or 2 folks a year, so I stand by my earlier comment - not ideal prey for first hunt.
    The OP is going to be living in Kalispel, he is going to have to be “bear aware” every time he is out in the hills, even when he is hunting squirrels. The bear that is going to get you is not the one you are hunting, it is going to be that brown furry tractor one....
    “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.” - Jack London

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    Any particular advise you have for staying bear aware? I'd like to pass this info along to my wife as well.

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gem Lake, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,120

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMB View Post
    Any particular advise you have for staying bear aware? I'd like to pass this info along to my wife as well.
    Start here:

    http://fwp.mt.gov/recreation/safety/wildlife/bears/

    I am by no means an expert, but being aware of your surroundings, giving bears a wide berth, keep a clean camp, and always have some bear spray on your person (and know how to use it). If you can be smart and get comfortable hunting with the idea of sharing the mountainside with them, you will be just fine.
    “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.” - Jack London

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,651

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    Good info here. OP has taken the right path to learn and is getting the advice he needs. I particularly like the advice on reduced loads for deer. I have never had a problem with recoil in the field, ( the adrenaline carries you). Shooting targets with my 338 beats me to hell.

    I too would be cautious with bear as my first game animal. But, it is doable.
    Last edited by bobbydean; 06-27-2018 at 09:48 AM.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Kalispell MT
    Posts
    118

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    Another Kalispell resident here. I think all the advice so far is great. I’m always overwhelmed by the options with all the local public land. PM me if you have any specific questions from local hiking trails to the best breweries

  18. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMB View Post
    Hey guys,

    I posted this on another forum and was advised to check out this forum from one of the members. Thanks, Dale!

    This is a pretty embarrassing thing to post but if I ever want to learn, I have to do it. I'm a citified guy. I’ve lived in Miami, NYC, and LA for the last 18 years. I'm 36 and have never hunted.
    My wife and I are moving to Kalispell, MT in a few weeks and we've never even been there before! We just know we don't want the city life and decided to pack everything up and get out. We did the same thing here in Prescott, AZ. We left LA and moved here without visiting before. We got a taste for being away from the city and now we want to go even further.

    I took the hunter ed course in CA and got a license there as well as AZ but never did anything with it. I just didn’t know where to begin. It’s a bit overwhelming to go at it alone. When I tried to discuss hunting in LA I’d end up offending people. I knew I had to get out of there.

    I love the outdoors and I own several firearms, including a Weatherby Backcountry in 300 win mag. I've only used it at the range but I bought that rifle because I want to hunt. I’ve been told that’s too much gun for most hunting and I’m definitely open to suggestions on a better option. I also purchased a bow about a year ago. I went to the local shop and shot a few of them. I’m a fairly large guy (6’6” 275) so they suggested the PSE Evolve 35 with a 70lb draw. I don’t really know much about bows but I know that I enjoy shooting it! I’ve been practicing on a block in the backyard.

    My question for you all is... How can I get started? I want to learn from seasoned hunters and get out there but it's tough to find people. I feel embarrassed and don't want to annoy people by asking. I also work from home doing voiceovers so I can’t just ask the guys at work because there are none! Haha

    I'd appreciate any suggestions/advice.

    Thanks,
    -Matthew
    I know I am a little late to the game, but first, thanks for introducing yourself the right way instead of just coming into the forum asking for advice on a hunting area . It's amazing how much better the forum will respond to you. I hunted as a kid but we didn't have much success and started to learn from my father-in-law in my mid 20s. As I have started to have success over the last severalyears its amazing the number of people that want to "tag along". You will find many people are relunctant to provide great info on hunting areas (it has taken them years to develop this info and they dont want an area ruined). One recommendation I have given numerous people is to do your own scouting and then ask an experienced hunter to go along. I have offered to help many new hunters if they will put in the time and come up with an area. In turn very few have put in the time and effort to take me up on the offer, but those that have put in the time have become life long friends. Moral to the story, as you meet successful hunters taken them serious and it will greatly payoff.

    I have also noticed that wife doesn't seem to care that I am gone additional time if I am out helping a beginner. I wonder if others experience the same thing.

    Being able to have an experienced hunter in the field will greatly help, especially when it comes to spotting game. Spotting game will be one of your biggest hurdles. Too many people get intimidated by field dressing and butchering, but these skill is quickly learned while spotting game is often overlooked and the largest skill you will use. I remember when I first started hunting with my father-in-law and I swore he was magically making the animals appear because I wasnt seeing anything. Fast forward to now and I hear similar statements from new hunters when I am with them in the field. It takes time and can be humbling, especially when a young kid is also seeing animals and kicking your butt.

    I will stay out of the caliber conversation because I think it is a subject that you need to decide on the range. As you mentioned earlier, deer hunting is a great introduction to the sport. There is a reason that the vast majority of us cut our teeth on deer.


    Quote Originally Posted by rideold View Post
    There are a variety of podcasts that are instructive as well but yes, as mentioned above, going out with someone is a great help.
    There are some amazing podcasts that I highly recommend and then some that are HORRIBLE. A good start is Cody Rich's podcast The Rich Outdoors. There are some real nuggets if you listen for a while.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan2782 View Post
    You will research and find out so many ideas, tips, and tactics it can seem overwhelming and nerve-racking. I think the hardest thing for new hunters as an adult that I have noticed is just finally making it out to hunt.
    Ryan brings up a good point. It's super easy to get confused with different, and sometimes contradicting strategies. Find a strategy/philosophy and stick to it. One thing that I have found so interesting while listening to podcasts is that people from all walks of life have different strategies and are able to find success if you put in the time.
    Last edited by utahminer; 06-27-2018 at 02:41 PM.

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    Thanks for taking the time to comment, guys. I really appreciate you all helping a newbie out.

    Cheers,
    -Matthew

  20. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMB View Post
    Thanks for taking the time to comment, guys. I really appreciate you all helping a newbie out.

    Cheers,
    -Matthew
    If you stay engaged and constructive, this Forum (and Randy's other content channels) will bless you with a lifetime of hunting knowledge and support. Best of luck, and if you want to start upland hunting, drop me a pm - I am a much more useful resource on that topic.
    "Freedom is NOT Free"

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    I am a newbie like you, all i can say is your on the right track here. Just stop wasting time and go make some mistakes, that's what i have done. It has been amazing, good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Martin View Post
    Also you can probably find reduced recoil loads for your .300 to practice and hunt deer with. IMO, your .300 is about as perfect an elk rifle as you can find IF you can manage it. The reduced recoil loads will nearly mirror .308 performance in your .300 Win Mag.
    I’d do this long before buying a new rifle.

    You’ll probably want that full power in a few years, whether you actually need it or not.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo and Ned
    Thin out their numbers

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    I’d probably start out with Steve Rinella’s book on big game hunting. It’s basic, but takes you through it all start to finish. Everything from gear to hunt strategies to butcheing and cooking.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo and Ned
    Thin out their numbers

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    As you can tell from the variety of responses, everyone has their own recipe for success when it comes to hunting. The beauty of it is you can make your hunt whatever you want it to be. Find a weapon and method that you're confident with for the animal you're after and have fun. Try not to get hung up on all the messy details and do what fits you best. The 300 win is a great round... if you shoot it well enough to put the bullet where it needs to go. Practice with it and get proficient and be honest with yourself in your abilities. If you can't shoot it without flinching then downsize a little bit: 30-06, 308, 270, 280, 7mm08, and 6.5 Creedmoor are all great rounds with significantly less recoil than the 300 and will kill anything from deer and antelope to elk with good shot placement and tough bullets. Above all, enjoy your time in the woods and welcome to the club.

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    Focus on learning how to shoot (Whatever weapon) proficciently.

    To me this is VERY important. Possibly the most important.

    The rest can be learned by trial and error.

    Executing the shot is critical.

    I tell everyone that I hunt with that they can be the best hunter in the world. But if they cant execute the shot, then its all for nothing.

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