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  1. Default Looking for arrow recommendations (Chime in you experts!)

    I just purchased a new PSE stinger bow on the internet. This is the first bow I've purchased since back in 1986, so I thought it's time to buy an upgrade. (ya think?) !!! Anyway, I have a 29" draw and will be shooting this bow at 70 lbs.
    In that I haven't bought arrows in a long time, I'm not sure what would be the best, yet somewhat economical arrow for my new bow? I was told I needed an arrow spine of 350. The outfit that sold me the bow, wanted to recommend I buy some Victory brand arrows from them, however I've never heard of that brand.
    Anyone out there have any recommendations on what arrow would work well for me? I'll be hunting Elk with this come Fall.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    There was a recent thread about the same thing. I think half the guy's on here recommend Easton full metal jacket arrows. I've used them for years and love them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Socialist Republic of Kalistan
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    Default

    Victory are very high quality arrows, I am using the RIP TKO with the SS inserts. I ended up buying 4 total dozen and won't need arrows for years.

  4. #4

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    Use 100 grain broadheads and a 340 spine weight in Gold Tip Hunter series and never had an issue with any game. Used them for a long time and have several arrows that's been through a few animals and still in good shape, can't say the same for the broadhead! If you are willing to toy around with different setups, maybe pick up a half dozen arrows and set each up different. Two with two inch fletching, two with 4 inch fletching and 2 feathered. If your not worried about sacrificing speed, you could try to set up one arrow on each of the different fletching with a twist to see if makes an improvement or not. One with a two inch fletching on straight, one with a 4 inch fletching and offset and one with helical. There's pros and cons to each, longer or shorter fletching or adding a twist or not. Lots of variables but fletching are easy to replace and manipulate but can make an impact.

    Here's a good article to read about fletching:
    https://www.gohunt.com/the-archers-guide-to-fletchings
    Last edited by JLDemo; 06-07-2018 at 04:33 PM. Reason: added
    "It's true hard work never killed anybody, but I figure, why take a chance?" -Ronald Reagan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Bitterroot Valley, MT
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    Goldtips for 10 years now. No issues. 3 Blazers fletched on. 125gr fixed.
    "There are no words that can tell the hidden spirit of the wilderness, that can reveal its mystery, its melancholy, and its charm." ~TR

    "He was a mighty hunter before the Lord." ~Genesis 10:9

  6. #6

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    Barring any oddity like short draw length or low poundage, general recommendation I've seen is anything over 400 grains grains, usually under 500 with a minimum of 10% front-of center. Spine depends on a lot of variables but 340 should work if you're cutting arrows at 29, using 100 grain heads and standard inserts. Putting heavier points or inserts you might need to go to 300 but use the manufacturers charts or archersadvantageonline.com to be sure.

    Easton and goldtip are the major brand names with a long history but carbon express, victory, black eagle, etc. are all fine too. Just make sure your spine, weight and FOC are good and each arrow will have its tradeoff in price, consistency, durability and insert woes. I will say FMJs need special care as they do bend and anything with a hit insert, halfout, outsert or deep six threads add more concerns than your usual set ups.

    Blazers are the de facto standard vanes anymore. If you're fletching your own onestringer wraps, arizona ez mini jig and ultra control gel super glue make life easy and put a ton of helical on it.

    https://www.goldtip.com/Resources/Spine-Chart.aspx
    https://www.goldtip.com/Resources/Ca...alculator.aspx
    Last edited by dcestnik; 06-07-2018 at 06:36 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    central pa
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    245

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    I've been using Carbon Express Maxima Blue RZ for about a year.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Wise River, MT
    Posts
    1,182

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    I also shoot a 70# bow with a 29" draw. Been using 5575 Gold Tip XT Hunters for 15 years with great results. Fitted with 100 grain Muzzy's, they have shot plenty of deer and elk over the years.
    "The Rocky Mountains is the marrow of the world" Del Gue

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dcnik View Post

    Easton and goldtip are the major brand names with a long history but carbon express, victory, black eagle, etc. are all fine too. Just make sure your spine, weight and FOC are good and each arrow will have its tradeoff in price, consistency, durability and insert woes. I will say FMJs need special care as they do bend and anything with a hit insert, halfout, outsert or deep six threads add more concerns than your usual set ups.


    https://www.goldtip.com/Resources/Spine-Chart.aspx
    https://www.goldtip.com/Resources/Ca...alculator.aspx
    What this guy stated: Get an EXPERT to figure out spine, weight and FOC. Doesn't matter what brand you have if it doesn't fly properly.

    good luck to all
    the dog
    "it's the HUNT, not the KILL"

  10. #10

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    Everything listed so far will do the trick, but I keep coming back to the Easton FMJ. I definitely agree that spine is extremely important, you can typically make a stiff arrow shoot well for you but you'll have nothing but problems with a weak spined arrow.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Central California
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    I would suggest drawing back with and uncut arrow and marking it, then measuring how long it needs to clear the riser and/or rest. This is going to depend on the type of broad head your planning on using such as fixed, forward deploying or rear deploying mechanical head. Then you have a basis for determining spine based on point weight using the arrow charts. As far as arrow combinations there's dozens of choices and based on your setup and hunting situation there's an arrow for that. personally I like the deep six fmj but broad head choices are limited so I usually go with 5mm FMJ

  12. #12

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    Can’t really go wrong with any of the major arrow manufacturers these days. That said, you need to shoot the spine matched to YOUR setup. I always start with punching holes in paper, and I look for inconsistencies in my tears. If you know your centershot, nock height, timing, and grip are all dialed, then random left, right, high, or low tears are usually a good indication of whether your spine is off or not. If you consistently shoot bullet holes, say with a 340 spine, 100 grain tip and 400 gr. overall weight, and you’re happy with the groups youre getting, then stay there. If you want more foc, and more weight going down range, slap some 125’s up front and see how they tear/group, and readjust from there.
    Gotta stick and make 'er pay

    Take the journey, learn from it, and obsess over it.......repeat

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