Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1

    Default Antelope Meat and Pets

    I cooked antelope steaks for dinner tonight and it seemed to drive the family pets bonkers. One of the cats kept obsessively trying to leap onto the table and steal meat from our plates (which he succeeded in once). He was unusually brazen in his efforts. After the meal, I took the trimmed bits of fat and connective tissue from my kids' plates and put them in the dog bowls. Soon after, I had to restrain our little female (14 pounds) from stealing all the bits from the male (60 pounds). It just felt like something weird was in the air. Anyone else ever experience this, or is it a fluke? I mean, as wild game goes, it does have an interesting aroma...

  2. #2

    Default

    My dogs go nuts for any kind of wild meat. I think I would of had to throat punch that cat if it was jumping up on the table though.
    Life is too short for stupid dogs and ugly guns.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Pueblo West, Colorado
    Posts
    733

    Default

    My kids and wife do the same thing when I cook antelope...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    157

    Default

    We have fed our Siamese cats raw elk or antelope almost every day since we brought them home as kittens, 5 1/2 years ago. They love the elk but Sushi and Kobe much prefer antelope. They relish it. Unfortunately, I haven't brought antelope home for two years. Some good friends gifted me some 2016 antelope but I didn't dare tell them that some of it was going to our cats.

    The only thing the cats like as much as raw antelope is seared (mostly raw) Ahi tuna, which they get weekly. The frozen Ahi from Sam's has always been excellent sushi grade meat. Our cats get a variety of grain-free-only food. The raw game meat is what I have carefully butchered and packaged myself. Raw meat is highly digestible and better tolerated than commercial pet foods. We also prepare baked chicken for them, mixed with taurine, bone meal and fish oil. Home prepared food is better quality and cheaper than premium commercial pet foods.

    I hope to draw a pronghorn tag this year because we love the meat as much as our cats do.



    Name:  P1210089.jpg
Views: 431
Size:  57.5 KB
    So far, so good.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hummer View Post
    I hope to draw a pronghorn tag this year because we love the meat as much as our cats do.
    Name:  P1210089.jpg
Views: 431
Size:  57.5 KB
    There's a new one...lol

  6. #6

    Default

    Our cat will rub constantly on any antelope horns or skulls we have in the house or outside, not much on any other antlers . Wonder if the sage aspect of their diet somehow smells of catnip to them.

  7. #7

    Default

    interesting... i'm going to have to thaw some of my pronghorn to see how the cats react. I enforce a strict no on the table while we're eating rule(with a spray bottle and a swift hand lol)

    Ever clean with clorox before? We have 2 boys and they'll fight each other to lay on the bathroom floor after we've cleaned it with clorox, the dog just looks at them perplexed.

  8. #8

    Default

    Hummer...I think your cats eat better than most humans

  9. #9

    Default

    Pronghorn meat is such a favorite at my house that Hank Dawg hasn't gotten the chance to develop a taste for it...

  10. Default

    My dogs seem particularly fond of all red meat game as well (particularly elk and duck). I often toss them raw trimmings when trimming meat for the freezer. The stuff that makes it to the plate is usually seasoned with pepper etc. so I don't give them anything from the plate but will sometimes process and BBQ less desirable trimmings along side mine un-seasoned for them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    157

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tradewind View Post
    Hummer...I think your cats eat better than most humans

    I'm sure they do, they're our kids after all. Like with humans, feeding pets quality, healthy food can lead to longer, healthier lives. It takes more effort than fast food but in the long run it's less expensive.

    We've had three generations of long-lived male & female Siamese since 1971. The first gen loved deer and elk meat and lived to 21 years. The second pair wouldn't touch game or foods other than commercial cat kibbles. They only lived to 13.3 and 15.4 years, and died of kidney disease. Genetics would be a factor but I'm convinced the prevalence of kidney disease in cats is due to corn and other grains in commercial cat foods.

    Our third gen has only gotten grain-free food, both commercial and home prepared, and they get game meat virtually every day of their lives. The digestibility of raw is well known and our cats have fewer digestion issues when they eat more raw elk and antelope. We'll see how that works out.


    Name:  Kobe & friend.jpg
Views: 309
Size:  30.4 KB
    So far, so good.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Wise River, MT
    Posts
    1,147

    Default

    This is interesting. We will be having antelope backstrap tomorrow night and I'm curious to see how our cat reacts when we make it.
    We haven't had antelope in 6 or 7 years- it's a shame, I know. BTW Southern Elk, this fabulous pronghorn backstrap you gave us is for human consumption only! No pets.
    FWIW- our dog won't touch bear meat- cooked or not. He loves every other kind of game meat though.
    "The Rocky Mountains is the marrow of the world" Del Gue

  13. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hummer View Post
    I'm sure they do, they're our kids after all. Like with humans, feeding pets quality, healthy food can lead to longer, healthier lives. It takes more effort than fast food but in the long run it's less expensive.

    We've had three generations of long-lived male & female Siamese since 1971. The first gen loved deer and elk meat and lived to 21 years. The second pair wouldn't touch game or foods other than commercial cat kibbles. They only lived to 13.3 and 15.4 years, and died of kidney disease. Genetics would be a factor but I'm convinced the prevalence of kidney disease in cats is due to corn and other grains in commercial cat foods.

    Our third gen has only gotten grain-free food, both commercial and home prepared, and they get game meat virtually every day of their lives. The digestibility of raw is well known and our cats have fewer digestion issues when they eat more raw elk and antelope. We'll see how that works out.
    Makes sense as cats are obligate carnivores.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    In the middle
    Posts
    418

    Default

    All of our dogs (and cats back in the day) live exclusively on raw meat. Much of it is wild game. I don't know that they find any particular species more tasty than others, but the certainly love them all. Nothing like handing them a pound and and half of venison or half a rabbit, or whatever and off they go (best served outside). Their health is simply beyond compare to the kibble fed dogs I've had long ago. If you want a healthy pet, feeding raw is the way to go in my opinion.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Decatur, OH
    Posts
    1,079

    Default

    My dogs when I was at home with dad and mom always ate well in hunting season. My dad is a taxidermist and you'd be surprised at the people who cut the neck off long when they bring the head into a taxidermist. There is usually a good neck roast left. Not necessary being safe for human consumption by the time it made it to the shop, dad would throw these necks to the dogs. They were the healthiest dogs you ever saw, consisting solely on necks throughout the hunting season. It was hard to get them to touch their dog food once the bounty subsided and hunting season was over. We raised some excellent deer tracking dogs like this. One in particular was a sure bet to find a wounded deer. He helped me a few times and was highly requested by neighbors and friends. I recovered a really nice 10-point buck that I hit through one lung. I got to the place he had him bayed to find him hanging off the deer's neck Stuck another arrow in the deer and it was over.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    157

    Default

    It is of note that the CPW and probably other wildlife agencies caution against feeding game meat to pets. They aren't specific as to the reasons but it may be due to the possibility of lead, CWD, worms and other parasites that could be in the meat and fat (more under the hide). Personally, I don't feed meat to our cats until it's been in the deep freeze at -15F for at least 30 days, which will kill any parasites.

    Our cats aren't very big so they don't get more than about 2 tablespoons of raw game meat per day. An elk feeds our family for a year.
    So far, so good.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    157

    Default

    Btw, our cats aren't alone in an appreciation for elk carpaccio:

    https://onyourownadventures.com/hunt...arpaccio-Salad
    So far, so good.

  18. #18

    Default

    My cats consume about 1 goat per month. Raw meat frozen for at least 1 month.

  19. #19

    Default

    I gave my dog some lope scraps the other night and he crapped in the house....

  20. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hummer View Post

    The only thing the cats like as much as raw antelope is seared (mostly raw) Ahi tuna, which they get weekly. The frozen Ahi from Sam's has always been excellent sushi grade meat. Our cats get a variety of grain-free-only food. The raw game meat is what I have carefully butchered and packaged myself. Raw meat is highly digestible and better tolerated than commercial pet foods. We also prepare baked chicken for them, mixed with taurine, bone meal and fish oil. Home prepared food is better quality and cheaper than premium commercial pet foods.

    I hope to draw a pronghorn tag this year because we love the meat as much as our cats do.


    ]
    Wow, your cats eat better than most people.

  21. #21

    Default

    Our dog gets raw turkey 2x a day and grain-free dry food 1x. We do microwave the turkey to warm but not cook because our Vet suggested this as a way to reduce bacteria that might be in the raw meat. The dry food helps get teeth clean and provide some vitamins and minerals. Yes, we are a two income home and are also empty-nesters with our kids all successfully adulting in good careers. I damn well know my worst day of last year would be the best day of some people's entire life. Thankful for every day.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Westen Montana
    Posts
    769

    Default

    Easy answer..........................they know how awesome antelope is to eat! Human's aren't the only one to get that one right!

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Socialist Republic of Kalistan
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hummer View Post
    Btw, our cats aren't alone in an appreciation for elk carpaccio:

    https://onyourownadventures.com/hunt...arpaccio-Salad
    Great pics in the above old post, I love carpaccio of fish and wild game. Probably my preferred loin preparation as it lasts longer than just grilling to rare and eating in big chunks! I have always snacked on raw wild game meat as I butcher... Little olive or avocado oil, sesame oil, and dark ponzu is a great dressing/ sauce to make it go an Asian direction similar to my favorite sushi restaurant's ahi carpaccio. Man, I am hungry now! I haven't yet gotten a pronghorn, but can't wait to finally draw a CA tag or head to WY, etc.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Timberville, VA
    Posts
    1,985

    Default

    Your dogs get venison and mine will eat cow turds from time to time. I guess one animals crap is another animals filet mignon.

    On a side note, I have been known to rub all over horns too and I don't think a simple throat punch could keep me from steeling a piece of grilled pronghorn steaks.
    Self proclaimed Founder, President, and Spiritual Leader of the I.S.V.F......Introduce Speedgoats to Virginia Foundation

  25. #25

    Default

    We slow cook our antelope, deer, and elk trim overnight, chop it in a food processor and freeze flat in gallon size ziplocks for catfood.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •