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  1. #1

    Default 3 season tent vs 4 season

    So whats the consensus on tents? How late in the year will you guys run 3 season or do you just run 4 season from archery on thru rifle hunts? I have a 3s that I have used on warm stuff but am considering going later with the backpack and tent so am thinking of just running a 4 season all year. I hate being cold and will adjust my bag system more for temps im thinking. Whats everyones favorite 4 season tent? The new Stone Glacier looks nice, or just spring for a Hilleberg?

  2. #2

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    I asked a similar question a few years back and got some good advice: Hilleberg is a tent company. They make fantastic tents and have for decades. Just get the known product and don’t over-think it.

    That was solid advice. I bought a Hilleberg Akto and I’ve been pleased. Getting ready to buy a Hilleberg group tent.

  3. #3

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    I think it depends on where you are camping. Higher altitude with a potential for high winds and/or heavy snow load? 4 season for sure. I think you can get by with a 3 season in the winter depending on weather and site selection. At least I hope so. I'm headed on a snowshoeing overnight this weekend and planning on taking my old REI Quarter Dome 3 season tent. I'll let you know the verdict on Monday.
    We salute you, tender creature, for the sacrifice of your juicy meat.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    1,264

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    Kifaru Tut with a Smith cylinder stove.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Fort Peck, MT
    Posts
    1,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rmyoung1 View Post
    I asked a similar question a few years back and got some good advice: Hilleberg is a tent company. They make fantastic tents and have for decades. Just get the known product and don’t over-think it.

    That was solid advice. I bought a Hilleberg Akto and I’ve been pleased. Getting ready to buy a Hilleberg group tent.
    What do you think that Hilleberg heats up to on a 0* night?
    "I'll put some whiskey into my whiskey"

  6. #6

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    In 0*-10* type winter temps I've generally gotten an additional 10-20 degrees inside the tent depending on the interior volume and solo vs. 2 people. The four season tents I've used (at least that come to mind) are Hilleberg Allak, Moss Stardome/MSR Fury, Hilleberg Nallo 2 GT, Big Agnes String Ridge, Mountain Hardware Trango, and Rab Latok Summit. A three vs. four season tent title is no guarantee of features. There are three season tents I'd take all winter over some labeled four season. I used a Hilleberg Niak (3 season) for a little solo backpack trip in the Hoback Basin last month. In heavy wind it has a higher cut fly for spindrift than I like but otherwise it's rock solid. Until you try some different options in different conditions it's really hard to say one or the other will fit your needs better.

    The Stone Glacier tent looks great, though I can't say I want one in particular. I disagree with them that a "fly over pole" design is a better mousetrap, but that's fine. It has been on the market for a while, just not branded as Stone Glacier, look at: http://www.slingfin.com/Tents/alpine...ents/windsaber


    String Ridge and a NF Mountain 25 on the Ingraham glacier.



    Nallo 2 GT on a November hunt.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Eden Prairie, Minnesota
    Posts
    369

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    Consider what makes a 4-season tent rated 4-season. Usually it comes down to wind/snow load and a full coverage fly. I agree with SnowyMountaineer that I have some "3-season" tents that I more than trust in winter. I wouldn't waste money on a 4 season tent unless I planned on camping in full on winter-style mountaineering situations. Don't get caught up on a 4-season rating. Plenty of people winter camp in the open, under tarps, in snow shelters, single wall shelters and finally in dual wall shelters of different ratings.

    My new go-to for the cold weather is a Seek Outside Cimarron with ultralight stove. Handled wind and snow just fine and the stove is magical in the cold.

  8. #8

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    Big Sky Chinook is a nice light 4 season tent.
    Plus its free standing which makes winter set up much easier.
    You can also run just the dome in the summer and leave the nest at home, making it a light free standing single wall shelter.

    I agree with above, what I look for when winter camping is snow load. I prefer to have the third pole.
    I have used many single wall shelters in late fall and winter but got tired of dealing with all the condensation.
    Last edited by BigTimber; 02-14-2018 at 09:05 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Fort Peck, MT
    Posts
    1,537

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    Quote Originally Posted by Epfd217 View Post
    Consider what makes a 4-season tent rated 4-season. Usually it comes down to wind/snow load and a full coverage fly. I agree with SnowyMountaineer that I have some "3-season" tents that I more than trust in winter. I wouldn't waste money on a 4 season tent unless I planned on camping in full on winter-style mountaineering situations. Don't get caught up on a 4-season rating. Plenty of people winter camp in the open, under tarps, in snow shelters, single wall shelters and finally in dual wall shelters of different ratings.

    My new go-to for the cold weather is a Seek Outside Cimarron with ultralight stove. Handled wind and snow just fine and the stove is magical in the cold.

    I love my cimarron but man that thing cools down in a hurry with no fire!
    "I'll put some whiskey into my whiskey"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Eden Prairie, Minnesota
    Posts
    369

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schaaf View Post
    I love my cimarron but man that thing cools down in a hurry with no fire!
    Well, no fire means now you're just camping in a regular tent. I've don'e plenty of winter camping, with and without a stove. Fire is for comfort, and nothing more. Your clothes and sleeping system should match the weather outside. If the fire goes out or you can't get a fire going, your sleeping bag should save you. Fire is nice for sitting around at night or warming the tent in the morning. The more I got used to having the stove, the better I slept at night and let the fire die until morning.

  11. #11

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    Last season in central Idaho we saw nights in the vicinity of 15* with a smattering of snow, freezing rain and sleet to start off the week. I used a marmot tungsten 1p with a 0 degree bag. The tent held up just fine and I would end up waking up an hour or two after falling asleep to shed a layer. A proper bag and a 900 calorie mountain house mac n cheese before bed served better for keeping comfortably warm than the tent itself.

    For all that, though, I am looking pretty hard at purchasing a nallo 2 for this year.

    Hope that helps.

  12. #12

    Default

    4 season for 3+ with the exception of a simple solo ultralight packer, if not, just an ultralight tarp or hammock...
    " There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag... We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language... and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people." - Theodore Roosevelt
    Live to work or work to live... Your choice.

  13. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlakeA View Post
    Kifaru Tut with a Smith cylinder stove.
    Floorless with a stove is my plan this year. Seek Outside also makes some cheaper options, but I hear Kifaru has the best material out there.

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