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  1. Default 8PT Buck - Running Dogs in North FL

    What's up everyone, excited to share our latest video with you - I shoot an 8 point buck in front of the dogs in North Florida.

    It's the first time we've captured a buck killed on camera and nonetheless while running dogs. Hope you find it as cool as we do! Let us know what you think.


  2. #2

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    Not sure if you're a troll or serious....

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimeOnTarget View Post
    Not sure if you're a troll or serious....
    Sorry, I don't follow?

  4. #4

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    It's interesting to see a differently hunting style and tradition, using dogs for deer definitely seems strange for us guys out west. I feel like it would be similar to watching someone in NZ shoot a bunch of geese with a rifle.

    Also...one mag one kill... was there any edible meat left?

  5. #5
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    When I was going to school at UNC a good friend invited me to join them for a similar hunt in eastern NC. I was skeptical to say the least but as a poor college student contemplating road kill this seemed like a way to fill the freezer if nothing else. It turned out to be oddly similar to hunting rabbits with beagles except the adrenaline rush was exponentially greater. It's certainly an ancient style of deer hunting unlike tree stands, high priced optics, and long range rifles. Doubt I'll ever do it again but I'm glad I got to experience it a couple times. It was a lot of fun.

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    Congrats on a good hunt and very nice usage of the drone for video. I've only ran deer dogs once. The lease had very strict antler restrictions and couldn't shoot does that season because of late summer flooding. Saw numerous does and good bucks though. Regardless of no shooters, it was a huge rush just knowing something was ahead of the dogs coming towards you.

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    Very interesting video. Congrats! That's something I'd really like to try someday. I grew up with grandpa and dad both having beagles for hunting rabbits and can see the allure to hunting deer in that country that way.

  8. #8
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    Memories of growing up. We stopped running dogs when I was around 13 but man what a way to grow up learning about hunting. It still amazes me how good my Dad was at knowing where to be and where the deer were going.
    I'm turning off Real Life Drive and thats right I'm hittin Easy Street on mud tires

  9. #9
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    I grew up hunting with dogs in Eastern NC when there were deer in only a few areas. My Dad took me on father/son day at his club and 20 minutes after taking my stand I had killed my first deer; ruined me for life. A lot of the appeal was in hearing the dogs run and I hunted this way for four years before going into the service. Service and my private sector job kept me out West and deployed for 15 years before moving back to NC.

    When I came back home there were deer in nearly all areas of the state, thick as rabbits, and the new generation of dog hunters were flying up and down the roads and two tracks in their four wheel pickups trying to cut off the deer before they got off the lease, communicating with CB's and it appeared that they were trying to kill everything on the property in the same day. In my day we had one man working the dogs and everyone else walked into the woods, stood at agreed upon places (stands) and if the dogs brought the deer to you fine, but if not there was always next Saturday. It was mostly about the hunt and the resulting fellowship, not so much about the kill.

    About the same time still hunting from ground blinds and rudimentary tree stands was becoming popular and since the new genre of dog hunters and their methods didn't appeal to me I no longer cared to dog hunt. If I want to hear the dogs run there's always rabbit hunting.
    Everything will be alright in the end. If it is not alright, then it is not yet the end.

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  10. #10
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    EB, that is a very exciting way to hunt. It's also alot harder than many realize. The part that bugs me is the radio, truck, and tracking collar. It's just too much technology for me. A lot of hunting has got that way, not just dogging.

  11. #11

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    I guess if you were just trying to eradicate deer from a property that might be the way to go. Tracking the dogs with GPS collars, multiple people waiting for an exhausted deer, scrambling around on a quad to intercept, no thanks. Why not actually run behind the dogs and put some effort into it? That's not my idea of hunting.
    That's why in Europe the call a driven bird hunt a "shoot" and not a hunt. That's what this is.
    If that is what you enjoy and it's legal, have at it.

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    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

    Cree Prophecy

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gr8bawana View Post
    I guess if you were just trying to eradicate deer from a property that might be the way to go. Tracking the dogs with GPS collars, multiple people waiting for an exhausted deer, scrambling around on a quad to intercept, no thanks. Why not actually run behind the dogs and put some effort into it? That's not my idea of hunting.
    That's why in Europe the call a driven bird hunt a "shoot" and not a hunt. That's what this is.
    If that is what you enjoy and it's legal, have at it.

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    You actually have no idea how few deer get killed this way. Our success rates drastically improved when we switched to stand hunting. To be uninformed and opinionated that's what's it's all about
    I'm turning off Real Life Drive and thats right I'm hittin Easy Street on mud tires

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudranger1 View Post
    You actually have no idea how few deer get killed this way. Our success rates drastically improved when we switched to stand hunting. To be uninformed and opinionated that's what's it's all about
    I said that's not my idea of hunting.
    You obviously didn't read the last line in my post. "If that's what you enjoy and it's legal, have at it."
    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

    Cree Prophecy

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    I grew up in coastal Georgia, we both stand hunted and ran dogs. Running dogs was always a thrill. Everybody on the hunt got meat. I enjoyed hearing the dogs baying and the older "dog" men arguing about whose dog was in the lead. Many folks from out west have no idea how thick those woods are.

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    How's that backstrap a la 00 shot?

    Never seen anything like this.
    Ryan T.
    "My biggest worry is that after I'm dead my wife will sell my fishing gear for what I told her I paid for it!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gr8bawana View Post
    I said that's not my idea of hunting.
    You obviously didn't read the last line in my post. "If that's what you enjoy and it's legal, have at it."
    I think mudranger was actually referring to your use of the word "eradicate", at least that would be my take given his personal knowledge on the subject.
    I'll save my big smiley for better occasion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Handlebar
    Many folks from out west have no idea how thick those woods are.
    Before I went back to MS and did a hunt I know I had no idea. After being there a day, I understood why they had box blinds, cut lanes and put out food plots. It is definitely a different way to hunt, it's not spot and stalk, but it is a hunt.
    God's trying to bless America, there's just too many people getting in the way.

  17. #17
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    I started my Hunting adventures in Northeast Louisiana hunting with my Uncle Marshall and Daddy when we ran dogs for Deer. You could only take Bucks back in mid 1960s and each one was a big deal. My cousins and I along with folks that worked at the paper mill with Uncle Marshall would show up early and places like Whorly Hill or Shiloh Church would be talked about. After all was said trucks would load up and the standers would be placed on old roads or older haul roads where we would wait for the chase to begin. As you stood there holding a Single shot Stevens you could hear Uncle Marshall on his horse yelling at the dogs to "Track em up!". Many times I have heard the dogs come right at me only to have a Doe with her yearling come across, then the dogs would pop out! Exciting when you are 10 or 12!!! I remember seeing Uncle Marshall come down a red clay road with a buck on the back of his TWH, man he looked like a Knight headed to a joust with his Shotgun pointed up in the air in one hand and the reins in the other. Around mid morning Aunt Betty would come by with a Thermos of hot coco and a still hot sweet potato. You drank the coco and used the tater as a hand warmer until it cooled down and then ya ate that sucker! Sometime it would get so quite in those woods the wind blowing through the trees it almost made you think you were all alone, you could think of all the things you wanted to do with your Life, stuff like that. Then you would hear a Cow or Goat Horn being blown to call the dogs in. Uncle Marshall always asked me to go with him to look for the "lost" dogs after the day's hunt. See, at just about every other intersection was a Mom and Pop store, beside it was a Dog pen where if you found someone's dog you put it in there for them to find. Each stop Uncle Marshall would tell me "Johnny, get ya a soda pop" I was so bloated with nickel sodas by the time we got back home! That is what Dog Hunting was to me. John
    “Here is your country. Cherish these natural wonders, cherish the natural resources, cherish the history and romance as a sacred heritage, for your children and your children's children. Do not let selfish men or greedy interests skin your country of its beauty, its riches or its romance.”
    ― Theodore Roosevelt

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    Neat video. It is interesting to see the cultures and hunting practices of different locales. Every type of hunting and locale has it's customs of what is considered ethical or not. I find it equally interesting how some whose hunting traditions differ from others are quick to pass judgement on what is ethical or not based on what their own traditions are.

    That video captured a hunting experience that I think I would enjoy some day. I'm certainly glad for the way our laws and hunting practices out west eliminate the use of dogs for hunting deer and elk since it would drastically change a lot of what I enjoy about the western hunting experience, but I can see how in the right terrrain, with the right group of people, that hunt could produce an incredible experience.


    Draftstud, I'm guessing by reading your description of your memories, you can actually recall the smells and tastes of that cocoa and sweet tater!


    I pity the person whose narrow and limited experience won't allow them to appreciate the enjoyment another feels from a different experience.

  19. #19
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    Oh, I wish I could take each of ya'll back to such a simple time and no Camo was needed! LOL John
    “Here is your country. Cherish these natural wonders, cherish the natural resources, cherish the history and romance as a sacred heritage, for your children and your children's children. Do not let selfish men or greedy interests skin your country of its beauty, its riches or its romance.”
    ― Theodore Roosevelt

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Martin View Post
    Neat video. It is interesting to see the cultures and hunting practices of different locales. Every type of hunting and locale has it's customs of what is considered ethical or not. I find it equally interesting how some whose hunting traditions differ from others are quick to pass judgement on what is ethical or not based on what their own traditions are.

    That video captured a hunting experience that I think I would enjoy some day. I'm certainly glad for the way our laws and hunting practices out west eliminate the use of dogs for hunting deer and elk since it would drastically change a lot of what I enjoy about the western hunting experience, but I can see how in the right terrrain, with the right group of people, that hunt could produce an incredible experience.


    Draftstud, I'm guessing by reading your description of your memories, you can actually recall the smells and tastes of that cocoa and sweet tater!


    I pity the person whose narrow and limited experience won't allow them to appreciate the enjoyment another feels from a different experience.
    CAN we be best friends? LOL
    you know Meat Eater did a couple episode series hunting down in South America and Rinella was coming off as an arrogant ass about the way those tribal people did their hunting. Later he changed his tune and brought it up on the show so I gave him some props for that, at least he was able to open his mind
    I'm turning off Real Life Drive and thats right I'm hittin Easy Street on mud tires

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRAFTSTUD View Post
    I started my Hunting adventures in Northeast Louisiana hunting with my Uncle Marshall and Daddy when we ran dogs for Deer. You could only take Bucks back in mid 1960s and each one was a big deal. My cousins and I along with folks that worked at the paper mill with Uncle Marshall would show up early and places like Whorly Hill or Shiloh Church would be talked about. After all was said trucks would load up and the standers would be placed on old roads or older haul roads where we would wait for the chase to begin. As you stood there holding a Single shot Stevens you could hear Uncle Marshall on his horse yelling at the dogs to "Track em up!". Many times I have heard the dogs come right at me only to have a Doe with her yearling come across, then the dogs would pop out! Exciting when you are 10 or 12!!! I remember seeing Uncle Marshall come down a red clay road with a buck on the back of his TWH, man he looked like a Knight headed to a joust with his Shotgun pointed up in the air in one hand and the reins in the other. Around mid morning Aunt Betty would come by with a Thermos of hot coco and a still hot sweet potato. You drank the coco and used the tater as a hand warmer until it cooled down and then ya ate that sucker! Sometime it would get so quite in those woods the wind blowing through the trees it almost made you think you were all alone, you could think of all the things you wanted to do with your Life, stuff like that. Then you would hear a Cow or Goat Horn being blown to call the dogs in. Uncle Marshall always asked me to go with him to look for the "lost" dogs after the day's hunt. See, at just about every other intersection was a Mom and Pop store, beside it was a Dog pen where if you found someone's dog you put it in there for them to find. Each stop Uncle Marshall would tell me "Johnny, get ya a soda pop" I was so bloated with nickel sodas by the time we got back home! That is what Dog Hunting was to me. John
    it's funny how memories stay so vivid sometimes. I remember staying out all night trying to find dogs. I don't remember ever losing any but my Dad talks about having to pick some up from people that had picked them up and taken them home. no corner stores anywhere near where we hunted lol. 1 of the last years we ran dog a friend of my Dad had come along with his Blue Tick Hounds. After running a deer for a while one of the dogs stayed in the woods and basically just sat down and started barking. Finally had to go into the block and bring him out. Dumb ass dogs, that guy wasn't invited back LOL
    I'm turning off Real Life Drive and thats right I'm hittin Easy Street on mud tires

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Martin View Post
    Neat video. It is interesting to see the cultures and hunting practices of different locales. Every type of hunting and locale has it's customs of what is considered ethical or not. I find it equally interesting how some whose hunting traditions differ from others are quick to pass judgement on what is ethical or not based on what their own traditions are.

    That video captured a hunting experience that I think I would enjoy some day. I'm certainly glad for the way our laws and hunting practices out west eliminate the use of dogs for hunting deer and elk since it would drastically change a lot of what I enjoy about the western hunting experience, but I can see how in the right terrrain, with the right group of people, that hunt could produce an incredible experience.


    Draftstud, I'm guessing by reading your description of your memories, you can actually recall the smells and tastes of that cocoa and sweet tater!


    I pity the person whose narrow and limited experience won't allow them to appreciate the enjoyment another feels from a different experience.
    I thought all Valley guys hunted on the "other side of the mountain" with their 7 week season and dogs after rifle season eded?

    Truthfully in areas where dogs are legal, you cant get a deer to move on its own unless you step on it. Peak rut is different but those areas have thick cover and ample habitat. I doubt most deer move more than a few feet a day unless pushed. Its exciting when things get boring and you have a dog light up at a distance. I prefer beagles to hounds though, the deer move but don't run full speed.
    Self proclaimed Founder, President, and Spiritual Leader of the I.S.V.F......Introduce Speedgoats to Virginia Foundation

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by tarheel View Post
    I grew up hunting with dogs in Eastern NC when there were deer in only a few areas. My Dad took me on father/son day at his club and 20 minutes after taking my stand I had killed my first deer; ruined me for life. A lot of the appeal was in hearing the dogs run and I hunted this way for four years before going into the service. Service and my private sector job kept me out West and deployed for 15 years before moving back to NC.

    When I came back home there were deer in nearly all areas of the state, thick as rabbits, and the new generation of dog hunters were flying up and down the roads and two tracks in their four wheel pickups trying to cut off the deer before they got off the lease, communicating with CB's and it appeared that they were trying to kill everything on the property in the same day. In my day we had one man working the dogs and everyone else walked into the woods, stood at agreed upon places (stands) and if the dogs brought the deer to you fine, but if not there was always next Saturday. It was mostly about the hunt and the resulting fellowship, not so much about the kill.

    About the same time still hunting from ground blinds and rudimentary tree stands was becoming popular and since the new genre of dog hunters and their methods didn't appeal to me I no longer cared to dog hunt. If I want to hear the dogs run there's always rabbit hunting.
    Yeah its even worse now with GPS collars in eastern NC. Guys just staring at a screen racing to where it looks like they are headed. Its a blast when done right.


    Nice video!

  24. #24

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    South Alabama dog hunting was definitely exciting. If the dogs headed your way, your heart was about to jump out of your chest. I was so proud the day, close to 40 years ago, when I killed a 10 pt. on a dim two track dead end road.....that road has been called the "10 point road" to this day.

  25. #25

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    Running dogs is definitely a different way to hunt however, it was very cool to experience it myself. I totally understand the reasoning for it, after being in those "bottoms" in south Alabama. A guy could barely crawl through that thick stuff. Never mind walking well or being able to see more than a few yards. The timber farms were doable but, hardly any wildlife. The deer used those farms as a highway between the thicker stands of vegetation.

    I truly enjoyed my experiences employing this method of hunting. I won't judge anyone from the South that uses it.
    Living in the "Last Best Place" - Montana
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