Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 45 of 45
  1. #26

    Default

    When I lived down in New Orleans I tried nutria and liked it. I would go down by Port Sulphur and get some nutria to eat and make some of my friends try it.
    FEAR THE CORN!!! GO BIG RED!!

    USMC (2002-????)

  2. #27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greenhorn View Post
    I'll try almost anything, but draw the line on eating rodents or snakes.
    Im with GH. This seems to be a regional thing I have lived in MT my whole life and not once I have heard of anyone here eating squirrels.

    I did see a meateater episode where Steve and Remi ate a coyote.
    In wine there is wisdom, in beer there is freedom, in water there is bacteria.

    ― Benjamin Franklin

  3. #28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Poke 'Em View Post
    Greenhorn, I'm glad you're too closed-minded to eat squirrels. There aren't that many in Montana, and it leaves more for me.
    You actually eat pine squirrels? mtmuley

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Laramie, WY
    Posts
    10,113

    Default

    Agree with the other guys from MT...it has to be a regional thing and I don't recall anyone from Montana, ever mentioning eating squirrels.

    My December elk trip to AZ was an eye opener, actually saw people hunting albert's squirrels...would have never guessed.
    "...the world outside, which my brother and I soon discovered, was full of bastards, the number increasing rapidly the farther one gets from Missoula, Montana." -Norman Maclean

    "They were still so young they hadn't learned to count the odds and to sense they might owe the universe a tragedy"
    -Norman Maclean

  5. Default

    great work!

  6. #31

    Default

    I wonder if you could substitute rabbit for squirrel and have it turn out the same?
    Pine squirrels aren't worth eating, but there are a fair number of cottontails and snowshoe hares around that might be in trouble if I can cook them like that!
    Aim Small, Miss Small

  7. #32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mthuntinfool View Post
    I wonder if you could substitute rabbit for squirrel and have it turn out the same?
    Pine squirrels aren't worth eating, but there are a fair number of cottontails and snowshoe hares around that might be in trouble if I can cook them like that!
    Substituting rabbit for squirrel is a much better meal. More tender plus you get more meat and less bone to pick around.

  8. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JTHOMP View Post
    Substituting rabbit for squirrel is a much better meal. More tender plus you get more meat and less bone to pick around.
    Rabbit might provide more meat, but I much prefer the taste of squirrel. That said, the two are generally interchangeable in any recipe.

    I've had mixed results eating pine squirrels. Sometimes they taste like turpentine, other times they taste phenomenal. I think brining them overnight in salt water helps a lot.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Timberville, VA
    Posts
    2,070

    Default

    Boiled three squirrels for a few hours, picked it clean and used it in stir fry. The dishes official name is SQUIR-Fry.
    Self proclaimed Founder, President, and Spiritual Leader of the I.S.V.F......Introduce Speedgoats to Virginia Foundation

  10. #35

    Default

    Look tasty, I just started squirrel hunting again with my kids. I forgot how much fun it is.

  11. Default

    I've always been a fan of squirrel and dumplings or chicken fried with gravy, I really need to gather up a batch as try squirrel pot pie

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    In the middle
    Posts
    978

    Default

    Squirrels are the best eating wild game in all of North America. They make Elk, grouse, antelope, you name it, taste pretty second class.

    I preferred mine grilled, but there is no such thing as a bad squirrel.


  13. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    In the middle
    Posts
    978

    Default

    Of course, we have but a fraction of the squirrels we used to have. They may have been the single most important food source for early european settlers in the eastern half of North America. It would have been something to have been there when herds of squirrels migrated past for weeks at a time.

  14. #39

    Default

    looks delicious to me
    To what avail are forty freedoms without a blank spot on the map?

  15. #40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CampRipleyLF View Post
    looks delicious to me
    Totally agree with CampRipleyLF. I really appreciate the details JTHOMP included in his post to make it easier to follow. I think this could be used on a number of small game, fowl, and store bought meat for less adventurous folks. Definitely going to share this with one of my hunting buddies who claims the big three of Kansas are whitetail, turkeys, and squirrels.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bitterroot Valley
    Posts
    5,734

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tjones View Post
    Im with GH. This seems to be a regional thing I have lived in MT my whole life and not once I have heard of anyone here eating squirrels.

    I did see a meateater episode where Steve and Remi ate a coyote.
    I'm open to eating most anything. Our squirrels are quit small compared to other areas in the US. I think the next Beaver and Bobcat will be on the menu for next winter.
    How much l wanted to take scalps, but it was not my kill.

  17. Default

    I always grow popcorn in my garden. This year the squirrels ate it all. If I can get my hands on one of them, I'll try this recipe for sure.

  18. #43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuzzH View Post
    Agree with the other guys from MT...it has to be a regional thing and I don't recall anyone from Montana, ever mentioning eating squirrels.

    My December elk trip to AZ was an eye opener, actually saw people hunting albert's squirrels...would have never guessed.
    It may be somewhat of a regional thing, but you need to remember that Pine squirrels and fox squirrels are quite different. I just watched a video, where some Montana guys were eating the nuts off a bison.... would have never guessed. I'll stick with fried fox squirrel.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    In the middle
    Posts
    978

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuzzH View Post
    Agree with the other guys from MT...it has to be a regional thing and I don't recall anyone from Montana, ever mentioning eating squirrels.

    My December elk trip to AZ was an eye opener, actually saw people hunting albert's squirrels...would have never guessed.
    Buzz, Abert's are one of the best eating squirrels in the country. I killed 30 of them my last year in Arizona. They are as good as any acorn-raised fox squirrel in the Midwest.

    Don't knock 'til you try it. They are WAY better than elk or pronghorn.

    And if you can't afford (or live long enough to draw) a sheep slam, you can always go for a squirrel slam
    https://www.fieldandstream.com/g00/p...ode-1001458293

    What people don't know about squirrel hunting is amazing.

  20. #45

    Default

    Squirrel is good stuff. My mom used to braise them in the pressure cooker until they were fall-off-the-bone tender. I always preferred grays to fox squirrels for eating, but the fox squirrels had pretty well crowded out the grays back in Minnesota. Red (pine) squirrels are generally not worth the trouble, they're a third the size of a good fat gray or fox squirrel. There really aren't any squirrels in Montana other than reds, so I'm stuck with bunnies. I was hoping to bag a couple of jacks to try Hank Shaw's Sardinian Hare Stew sometime, but Rinella's experience with fleas has put me off it somewhat.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •