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Thread: wyoming grouse

  1. Default wyoming grouse

    Headed to Wyoming on 10/18 for a mule deer hunt in Unit 34, thought while i was there i would do some grouse hunting since I`ve never got to.Would like some info on shot size,best terrain and how do they taste.............Thanks

  2. #2

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    .22
    Everywhere
    Flour, season, fried in oil.

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    The only grouse open at that time will be sharp tails, blues and ruffies. You will be a hike from ruffies. And sharpies are not prevelant many places outside of small pockets in the northeast part of the state. But there are blues in the Laramie range. But not huge numbers. Keep in mind it will be general deer seasons on the mountain and there will be lots of folks about.

    Shot size 3 or 4 steel
    In the Laramie Range, looking for aspens is usually a good place to start. But I haven’t chased them this late.
    Blues are some of the best tasting birds there are!

  4. #4

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    The dusky, blue grouse will move up in elevation with winter weather. They tend to like the conifer areas up higher later in the season. I agree a .22, either pistol or rifle works great.
    They do taste great, don't forget about the legs quarters also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by icebreaker12 View Post
    The only grouse open at that time will be sharp tails, blues and ruffies. You will be a hike from ruffies. And sharpies are not prevelant many places outside of small pockets in the northeast part of the state. But there are blues in the Laramie range. But not huge numbers. Keep in mind it will be general deer seasons on the mountain and there will be lots of folks about.

    Shot size 3 or 4 steel
    In the Laramie Range, looking for aspens is usually a good place to start. But I haven’t chased them this late.
    Blues are some of the best tasting birds there are!
    3 or 4 steel? I would suggest #6 at most, and would guess #7.5 would work fine. Just based off the wyo grouse ive shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JWP58 View Post
    3 or 4 steel? I would suggest #6 at most, and would guess #7.5 would work fine. Just based off the wyo grouse ive shot.
    I think 6 would get it done most of the time. But I shoot 4 for everything from ducks to sage grouse. Never had any issues. The lethality table suggests 2 or 3 for pheasants.

    https://gf.nd.gov/gnf/hunting/docs/t...lity-table.pdf

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    Hey thanks guys for the info

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    Quote Originally Posted by icebreaker12 View Post
    I think 6 would get it done most of the time. But I shoot 4 for everything from ducks to sage grouse. Never had any issues. The lethality table suggests 2 or 3 for pheasants.

    https://gf.nd.gov/gnf/hunting/docs/t...lity-table.pdf
    Interesting. Never shot a pheasant with anything bigger than 6's either....out of a 20ga no less

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by wytex View Post
    The dusky, blue grouse will move up in elevation with winter weather. They tend to like the conifer areas up higher later in the season. I agree a .22, either pistol or rifle works great.
    They do taste great, don't forget about the legs quarters also.
    The legs/quarters make the best soup ever.

  10. #10
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    I would select my shot sized based on 1) how it patterns in my gun based on choke and shot distance and 2) if I intended to shoot them on the wing or do a Randy Newberg on them.

    I agree on the legs, I save legs off of every bird I shoot from quail to geese.
    Fear the beard....

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