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  1. Default Water - how do you carry it?

    Seems like a simple enough question but I'm sort of at a loss. I've been using a Camelback and recently had one rupture inside my pack soaking everything (and leaving me without water). I've been thinking of carrying a MSR Dromedary but it just seems clunky and hard to refill a Nalgene.

    How do you pros do it? Any tips/tricks is helpful!

  2. #2

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    I use a stainless bottle, 32 oz. Katydin hiker filtration pump for refill. If there's not much water around I'll carry a half gallon.

  3. #3

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    I carry a bladder during bow seasons, but I switch to Nalgene bottles during colder hunts. I would highly recommend MSR or Platypus if you are going to use a Bladder. Camelback seems to have a ton of defects. I had one break during a hunt and I immediately switched to Platypus.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Andover, Minnesota
    Posts
    2,853

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    I have been through too many bladders, to do that anymore. I use 2 Nalgenes (one straight water and the other with some type of electrolyte replacement). If it is really hot a collapsible Platypus bottle in my pack for a backup, and if it is cold I may drop to just one Nalgene.
    “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.” - Jack London

  5. #5

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    Two 1.5L smart water bottles work pretty well. This past elk season I also took along a 10L Dromedary bag that I had plumbed a valve onto for camp water. So when I went to filter water I did 13L at a time, then went a couple days without having to filter. Works well if you're in one spot.

    Bladder vs bottles I much prefer bottles.

  6. #6

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    I'm more of a bladder guy. I usually have a 3L Camelback and then a 4L Dromedary that I tuck in if it's a ways between water sources.

  7. #7

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    Camelbak unbottle and a 32oz nalgene
    "Of what avail are forty freedoms without a blank spot on the map" - Aldo Leopold

    "Send a couple more slugs. It shows you care." - David Petzal

  8. #8

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    Bladder here as well. I try to be pretty careful with them, but (knock on wood) I haven't too many bad experiences. I do need to update mine. I personally dont like the sound of sloshing water and I am trying to sneak through the woods, so I try to stay away from bottles.

  9. #9

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    Warmer hunts: Camelback 70 ounce bladder & a water bottle w/ filter.

    Colder hunts: Yeti & hydroflask vacuum sealed bottles. Keeps warm stuff warm for a long time.
    A lesson was learned to not mix together silver bullets and a forum site.
    Fowl_Minded

  10. #10

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    I have a 1.5lt MSR & 2 -3lt Kevlar bags I got from Kenetrek.The Kenetrek bags are bomb proof,but can freeze up a bit at nozzle if you don't clear it out. The bag will if left out overnight. That & a MSR filter,unless I'm in camp.Then it's milk jugs filled with well water.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Southwest of Helena, MT
    Posts
    74

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    I've used a 3L Camelbak military grade bladder (currently marketed as the Antidote) for almost 8 years without any problem at all. I don't like the standard civilian ones, they don't feel like they are tough enough for long term use in the sticks. I also like the water tube, how it attaches, and the bite valve better on the military grade bladder.
    Last edited by rammac; 10-11-2017 at 05:38 PM.

  12. #12

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    I've pretty much changed it up on every hunt. This next hunt I'm going to carry a nalgene and a 4 liter MSR dromedary. I won't fill it up all the way, however.

  13. #13

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    I carry a 1.5L nalgene and a 1.5L Kleen Kanteen. I've never had one leak and the stainless kleen Kanteen doubles as an emergency "kettle" if I need to heat water over a fire once the cap is removed. I also have cocoons for both for cold weather, bladders and hoses freeze too easily. I've also had a bladder fail and ruin my day, never again. Bladders are easy, but I've spotted a surprising amount of game by forcing myself to stop and get a drink of water.
    Last edited by NW307; 10-11-2017 at 05:35 PM.

  14. #14

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    I've always use a 3 liter longneck beast camelbak bladder for quite a few years now. This year's elk hunt i was far enough from water at times and temps in the 90's that i would load up with an extra 8 liters using platypus gravity filter bags in addition to my regular 3 when i came across water at times. Sucks to carry but sucks less than being out of water.

  15. #15

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    2 one liter nalgene bottles and a katydyn hiker pro.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
    Posts
    3,847

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    Never had a bladder break. Lucky I guess. If you don’t want the tube to freeze drain it by raising it above your head and squeezing the bite piece.

    Water sloshing in bottles is too noisy for me.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnage2011 View Post
    I carry a bladder during bow seasons, but I switch to Nalgene bottles during colder hunts. I would highly recommend MSR or Platypus if you are going to use a Bladder. Camelback seems to have a ton of defects. I had one break during a hunt and I immediately switched to Platypus.
    Get one of these and you won't have to worry about it breaking. I have had mine for probably 4-5 years and put it through hell and it's still going strong. Cold weather, a bottle of any kind is probably a little better. I like just plastic bottles from the store that you can squeeze down so it doesn't make noise.
    No matter how good or bad the hunting is, never forget where you are.

  18. #18

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    I've never had a bladder break either but the line freezes when it's cold, and I find the a little awkward to refill when filtering water out of a spring. I use one sometimes during bow season with my fanny pack, but only on day trips.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    @ 7500' Colorado
    Posts
    162

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    Switched to nalgene bottles after getting a uv pen. Works great for me. Easier to clean than a bladder too. Left a few bladders moist and sealed up a few times. Trash after that. Couldn't get the smell/taste out.

  20. #20

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    Platypus 3L big mouth and a 2 L Platypus bottle. They compress as you drink from them so no slosh noise. They are tough and will not fail. I have used the collapsible bottle for years and it still works. Katadyn Hiker water filter pump and aqua tablets for emergency use.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    South East Colorado
    Posts
    7,331

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    I drink my own pee like Bear Grylls
    I'm an addict...archery, rifles, shotguns, handguns, muzzleloaders, hunting, fishing, fly fishing..and I don't want rehab

    CWEH...Colorado's Worst Elk Hunter 2007-2016 (but I'm still damned sexy)

  22. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnCushman View Post
    I drink my own pee like Bear Grylls
    Here you go.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  23. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rammac View Post
    I've used a 3L Camelbak military grade bladder (currently marketed as the Antidote) for almost 8 years without any problem at all. I don't like the standard civilian ones, they don't feel like they are tough enough for long term use in the sticks. I also like the water tube, how it attaches, and the bite valve better on the military grade bladder.
    I've never tried the Cambelback Military ones but I got one from a company, Source Tactical out of England, that makes them for the military. I forget where I heard about them but their bladders have proven pretty indestructible over the last 5 years I've had it. I've destroyed my share of camelback bladders, often at the most inconvenient times in the backcountry and these are much tougher. The tube, the valves, everything. The bladder itself is made from this ultra smooth rubber/plastic that supposedly cuts down on bacteria growth and the bite valves are designed such that the tube empties back into the bladder when you close the valve so the tube rarely freezes, a big plus since I use mine for bc skiing too.

    The one complaint is that when the bladder is in the pack sleeve and the pack is fully loaded, like 10lbs of pork in a 5lb casing packed, that much pressure can force water up the tube and sometimes leak slightly at the valve. But this has never happened when loaded up for day hunts and doesn't happen all the time when packing in with a maxed out pack. And sometimes I just pack the bladder last at the top of the pack and the problem is solved.

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