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  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWT View Post
    There is a theory that Parkinson's may be related to CJD. I would recommend to never eat brain or spinal chord from anything and take care to not introduce brain, spinal chord, or CSF fluid into your meat during processing.
    My wife and I were just talking about this last night. Her family has cabin property in eastern Wyoming where CWD is pretty bad. Both her grandfather, uncle and now my father in-law have all been diagnosed with Parkinson's.

    On a side note, if you can not "clean" the prions off of knives or butchering equipment, think about all the butchers that could have "tainted" equipment and wouldn't the practice removing a trophy (head or skull cap) taint your hunting knife? Maybe I need to rethink the need to go with disposable blade knife.

    Also, I read the same article first quoted in this thread off of Facebook last week. After reading the article I decided to read the comments to see if I could learn anything. It was scary to read some people's opinions. The number of people that think CWD is a conspiracy to keep people from hunting and spending time in the woods is amazing.
    Last edited by utahminer; 09-11-2017 at 03:49 PM.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
    Posts
    1,568

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    Quote Originally Posted by walking buffalo View Post
    Katqanna, contact Darrel Rowledge from the Alliance for Public Wildlife if you would like help in sources the information.
    Walking Buffalo, thanks. As soon as I get the worst of this move taken care of in the next 2 weeks, then I will take a look at the site and contact Rowledge.

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katqanna View Post
    Walking Buffalo, thanks. As soon as I get the worst of this move taken care of in the next 2 weeks, then I will take a look at the site and contact Rowledge.

    I'll pm his email. Darrel is Canada's leading CWD Policy advocate. He will outtalk you.

    Following is the first summary of this new finding to be released.

    Chronic Wasting Disease: CFIA Research Summary Embargoed until May 23, 2017
    (OCR of a scanned original)

    Research Findings

    Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a progressive, fatal disease of the nervous system of cervids including deer, elk, moose, and reindeer that is caused by abnormal proteins called prions. It is known as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). Other TSEs include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans.

    A limited number of experimental studies have demonstrated that non-human primates, specifically squirrel monkeys, are susceptible to CWD prions. An ongoing research study has now shown that CWD can also be transmitted to macaques, which are genetically closer to humans.

    The study led by Dr. Stefanie Czub, a scientist at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), and funded by the Alberta Prion Research institute has demonstrated that by orally administering material under experimental conditions from cervids (deer and elk) naturally infected with CWD, the disease can be transmitted to macaques.

    in this project, which began in 2009, 18 macaques were exposed to CWD in a variety of ways: by injecting into the brain, through contact with skin, oral administration, and intravenously (into the bloodstream through veins).

    So far, results are available from 5 animals. At this point, two animals that were exposed to CWD by direct introduction into the brain, one that was administered infected brain material by oral administration and two that were given infected muscle by oral administration have become infected with CWD. The study is ongoing and testing continues in the remaining animals. The early results will be presented at PRlON 2017, the annual international conference on prion diseases, in Edinburgh, Scotland, May 23 to 26, 2017.

    Potential impacts of the new finding

    Since 2003 Canada has a policy that recommends that animals and materials known to be infected with prions be removed from the food chain and from health products. Although no direct evidence of CWD prion transmission to humans has ever been recorded, the policy advocates a precautionary approach to managing CWD and potential human exposure to prions. These initial findings do not change Health Canada’s Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) position on food and health products. A precautionary approach is still recommended to manage the potential risks of exposure to prions through food and health products. Measures are in place at federal, provincial and territorial levels to reduce human exposure to products potentially contaminated by CWD by preventing known infected animals from entering the marketplace.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Danbury, Wisconsin
    Posts
    224

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    Quote Originally Posted by utahminer View Post
    My wife and I were just talking about this last night. Her family has cabin property in eastern Wyoming where CWD is pretty bad. Both her grandfather, uncle and now my father in-law have all been diagnosed with Parkinson's.

    On a side note, if you can not "clean" the prions off of knives or butchering equipment, think about all the butchers that could have "tainted" equipment and wouldn't the practice removing a trophy (head or skull cap) taint your hunting knife? Maybe I need to rethink the need to go with disposable blade knife.

    Also, I read the same article first quoted in this thread off of Facebook last week. After reading the article I decided to read the comments to see if I could learn anything. It was scary to read some people's opinions. The number of people that think CWD is a conspiracy to keep people from hunting and spending time in the woods is amazing.
    Yea that is fairly prevalent in my state. We had a group of organizations come together to form recommendations for CWD management. Basically it was pointless because our legislature and governor have basically ignored these recommendations. Anyways, the guy who heads Whitetails of Wisconsin, a group that represents game farms, stated that CWD has not killed one single deer in Wisconsin. Talk about a scary lack of knowledge

  5. #30

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    In recent years we have started genetic testing domestic sheep for scrapie susceptibility. Domestic sheep are being bred for resistance to scrapie. It is likely that there is a similar genetic susceptibility/resistance in other species as well, cattle, deer, humans, etc. This could be part of the reason CJD may or may not show up in CWD areas. There are different "strains" of the disease in different areas and I believe that it is highly likely that we share the same genetic resistance or susceptibility to prion diseases.

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