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Thread: Boots

  1. #1

    Default Boots

    Hey There!
    I got a pair of zamberlains last season for my elk hunt. They are awesome boots and really well built. The only complaint I have is that they rub on my inside right heel and this caused a blister on my last hunt. I am trying to better break them in for this season. I read online to get them wet inside and then do some hiking and this may help to break them in a bit. They feel great on my feet and are the right size,etc. My left one feels good. I have around 50 miles on them so far. Thoughts?
    "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it" -Norman Maclean
    "Segments of tightly stacked topo lines are the 'Stairway to Elk Heaven'"- Randy Newberg

  2. #2
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    Don't bother getting them wet...good way to destroy your feet. Wear them more often and progressively longer to break them in

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Mtn. Home, ID
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    Default

    That method I used to break in my boots for wild fire season. I wouldn't do that for a hunting boot though. Like mentioned above wear them. Also if your up to it wear them on a treadmill at max incline, or find some hills to climb. Walking on flat ground vs walking up hills in your boots will show you quick where you rub. In my experience anyway.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks guys! I have worn them hiking quite a bit and they only seem to rub on the one foot which has me a little concerned. As mentioned above I do have around 50 miles in them which i Know for a boot like that is just getting started but its not like I have only wore them around my living room for 30 mins either. I did try the water method (damp, not totally soaked) and hiked 2 miles last night with 55 pounds. It felt a TON better when I was done so maybe I am on to something. I think I need to keep plugging away and they will take shape.
    "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it" -Norman Maclean
    "Segments of tightly stacked topo lines are the 'Stairway to Elk Heaven'"- Randy Newberg

  5. #5

    Default

    What's your sock situation like? I'd give a thin poly liner sock under a med weight wool sock a try. Slap some duct tape over that hotspot before you take off on a hike for a time or two. Then try it without to see if it's broken in better. Another thing I've found is that footbeds can change the "volume" of the boot and that can cause the heels to lock in better to prevent blisters. I prefer the footbeds from Lathrop and Sons.

  6. #6

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    Guys thanks a ton for the input. I will keep trying and I do feel like I'm making slow progress.
    "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it" -Norman Maclean
    "Segments of tightly stacked topo lines are the 'Stairway to Elk Heaven'"- Randy Newberg

  7. #7

    Default

    about 60-70 miles on the boots. They feel amazing. But they do still rub on my heels. Not the exact back part....id call it the inside-back part. The best analogy I can use would be your finger. Not the point...and not the pad....the transition area between the two. Thats where its rubbing on my heel. Not the back and not the side.... Hard to say WHY its rubbing ONLY there. The sock liners made the rest of my feet feel amazing. Not sure Im going to be able to get around the rubbing issues short of ditching these boots and trying something else. I was going to try to coast through this elk season without any major purchases. I would consider boots a major purchase. May just use Leukotape and a blister pad (for prevention) and roll with it for this season. Kinda disappointed but its better then getting blisters. I love how these boots help carry the weight of my pack. They are very well broke in and I don't want to ditch them. Maybe I should.....
    "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it" -Norman Maclean
    "Segments of tightly stacked topo lines are the 'Stairway to Elk Heaven'"- Randy Newberg

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    https://sectionhiker.com/hiking-boot-lacing-techniques/

    Read this article. Try a few of these, and also you may try lacing LOOSER, which is counterintuitive.

    Honestly, I've never worn liners ever. I wear good quality merino wool (Smartwool, Darn Tough, Kenetrek, etc.).

    Don't wet your boots from the inside. That's a good way to get jungle rot on your feet and you'll end up needing Lysol to kill the bacteria and fungus that will take hold of your boots. You can wet the leather from the outside, just make sure you are treating the boots afterwards. Repeated wet/dry on leather can make the fibers shrink and crack.
    Fear the beard....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    New Orleans, La.
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    Try some Leuko Tape on your heel, then wear the boots and break them in.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    Western Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laelkhunter View Post
    Try some Leuko Tape on your heel, then wear the boots and break them in.
    I wear leukotape regularly as a precaution, even on short training hikes. Stuff sticks well and can easily last 2-3 days without replacing. I also wear a thin liner sock under my Darn Tough socks.

    Also, find a good podiatrist or cobbler. They can adjust that heel cup to help with the fit. I am fortunate in that I live close to Lathrop & Sons who not only sold me my Zambies but also fit them to me. It took a couple visits but I am very pleased.

    Love my Zamberlans. Hope yours works out.

  11. #11

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    Thanks guys. I went and had my foot re-measured today to make sure the first place didn't screw it up. Seems to be ok. I bought a boat load of Leukotape today.
    "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it" -Norman Maclean
    "Segments of tightly stacked topo lines are the 'Stairway to Elk Heaven'"- Randy Newberg

  12. #12

    Default

    So my foot measured between a 10 and 10.5 on the board. What size should I order in an early to midseason mountain boot. Liner sock and medium wool sock. Likely no insulation.
    "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it" -Norman Maclean
    "Segments of tightly stacked topo lines are the 'Stairway to Elk Heaven'"- Randy Newberg

  13. #13

    Default

    leukotape works wonders for me.....

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eyeguy View Post
    So my foot measured between a 10 and 10.5 on the board. What size should I order in an early to midseason mountain boot. Liner sock and medium wool sock. Likely no insulation.
    I always err to the larger side.
    Fear the beard....

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    New Orleans, La.
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    Definitely a little big is much better than a little small. You don't want your toes crunching the front of the boot, especially when going downhill. If a little big, you can use thicker socks to take up a little space.

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