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Thread: Mauser Project

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Jacksonville, Alabama
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    336

    Default Mauser Project

    I have always loved Mausers. Not the military rifles or the post war chop shop specials, but classic sporting rifles that were built on a 98 action. Some were built in prestigious shops such as Rigby, Griffin and Howe, or Simpson but many were built by unknown craftsman that were trying to make a living between the two wars. But they were all Mausers and were designed to be simple, accurate, and utterly reliable under all field conditions. Most of us today take how revolutionary these rifles were. Except for upgrades to the safety the only "advances" to the design have been to make them cheaper to manufacture.

    I have always wanted one of these classics, something along the lines of an Oberndorf type B, but have never found one in the configuration I wanted that was in my budget. I also have some reservations about buying a collector grade antique to use hardcore in the field. So I came up with the idea that I would build one, doing as much work as I could along the way.

    My project started with a $300 Husqvarna 8x57 that was built on an early C-ring commercial FN 98 action. So after 75 years of hunting caribou, moose, or red deer it was time for a remake. The rifle was built in 44, so it carried a beech stock due to the shortage of walnut during the war(bottom rifle of the pic with 2). With a little bit of help from a butane torch I salvage the sights and barrel band to go with the action. At this point I sent my action out for all of the work that required a lathe and began searching for an stock with the right lines. The action was trued and a match grade Douglas barrel was contoured to match the old barrel and installed. I had it chambered in the classic 7x57, it seemed fitting for the rifle I wanted.I also decided to have a Dakota 3-position safety added to the rifle. Thanks to a loss during shipping, I also had to add a New England Custom Gun Works banded front sight. When the action came back, it was time for my work to start. I hand fit a new rear sight blade and new bottom metal to it. Then the stock work began. I had settled on an old take-off stock to be refinished and Inletted to my action. I was apprehensive about learning on an expensive piece of walnut while learning a new hobby. It is bedded with devcon steel putty with 2 hidden crossbolts and a reinforcing steel rod in the wrist installed. I am sure I went overboard reinforcing the stock, but since I was working on it anyway, I added the steel while I was in there. I also made a Cape buffalo horn grip cap and inlay to cover an old sling swivel hole. It also got a pachmyer old English pad to give it a little LOP (I'm 6'8", so stocks never fit me). Then lots of coats of waterlox tung oil to wrap the project up. Since this rifle isn't going to be a safe queen, I opted to have the metal cerakoted.


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    Overall I am happy with how it turned out, especially for my first rifle building project. When I get the free time, I am going to install a Meopta 3x9 scope with the #4 reticle. I think we are gonna have a long career together.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Lake of the ozarks Missouri
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    939

    Default

    Very nice looking rifle. Nice job!!
    I work so I can hunt

  3. #3

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    Man, that is awesome. That one will be passed down for sure. Seeing what some of you guys do makes me want to build a rifle myself. Not that I really know anything about building rifles, but I've never heard of that steel bedding putty before. What is the advantage of that over say, glass bedding? Thanks for posting this!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Piedmont region of North Carolina
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    1,699

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    Nice looking reformation and I like your choice of caliber. I got my first Mauser in '65 when the military imports were cheap as dirt and have since added an Oberndorf DSM 34, an FN commercial and one I built a couple of years back on a Brazilian Model 1908 action. I stopped buying them just short of obsession.
    Everything will be alright in the end. If it is not alright, then it is not yet the end.

    Dol dh'iarruidh an fhortain do North Carolina.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Jacksonville, Alabama
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    Default

    rtraverdavis, I decided to use the Devcon for the bedding because the guys I work with that build tactical rifles give it good reviews and its consistency makes it easy to use. Devcon is almost like peanut butter and it has a long work time so it stays where you put it and is forgiving when you are trying to get the rifle pressed together.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    New Orleans, La.
    Posts
    314

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    Excellent job !! When you are bedding the action with Devcon, do you just set the action in, then let it cure or do you screw the action screws in almost all the way, or do you screw the action screws down to specs? It seems that if you screw the action screws in, then let it cure, there might be some "give', and the action is not bedded completely. But if you don't, the compound might not fully form the best contact area with the action. Just askin.......
    Last edited by Laelkhunter; 06-15-2017 at 09:43 AM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Nice work on a classic. I'm doing something similar with a ruger 77. Also have a Turkish mauser in the safe that I'm debating using as a project learner on filing metal, etc. Those old classics might be a little havy, but the germans were on point for their era and i have a Haenel that's under 7 pounds withva mannlicher stock. They are every bit the hunting weapon that they were in their day.

    Excellent stock work!
    A lesson was learned to not mix together silver bullets and a forum site.
    Fowl_Minded

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Jacksonville, Alabama
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    This is pretty much the guide I used, but mauser actions are shaped differently. I bedded it in 2 steps, the bottom then the top. My friend that has worked as a gunsmith said, bedding the bottom first gives you a flat surface that won't compress when pulling the top into place. I used stock maker screws snugged the top, then backed them off 1/4 or 1/2 turn. Tape is used to give you clearance on the bottom and front of the recoil "lug", while the rear face is bedded to a perfect match. He also said to tape off the rear of the tang to give clearance between the tang and the stock. There's also much less of a chance to glue your rifle together if you bed the top and bottom in phases.


    http://www.6mmbr.com/pillarbedding.html

  9. #9

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    Awesome work

  10. #10

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    I like it! And the 7x57 is my favorite cartridge to boot.

  11. #11

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    Thanks for the explanation of the Devcon, Foxtrot. That makes sense. Awesome work man.

  12. #12

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    That's cool. I'd get to the second pic with the goup and blue tape and quit. Stuff like that is intimidating. Looks great.
    "that's a special feeling, Lloyd"

  13. #13

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    Nice work, pretty rifle.

  14. #14

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    Could you provide some detail or guidance on the buffalo horn work? Have you done any sculpting, shaping or checkering on that material? I like it for the durability, historic use and the aesthetic; and it's a lot less expensive than metal.
    A lesson was learned to not mix together silver bullets and a forum site.
    Fowl_Minded

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Jacksonville, Alabama
    Posts
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    Ben, I chose horn for the same reason. It's soft and easy to work. I used knife scales to cut out the grip cap with a scroll saw. And a router to shape. Cut them bigger than you need so you can shape it back to the wood perfectly. Same with an inlay, leave it proud and then bring it back down. A file works to shape it. Then I used an emory board to take out the tool marks and fine shaping. It's pretty glossy, so it shows scratches. I progressed up to 600 grit wet sand paper then used a dremel tool with a polishing wheel and compound. Keep the dremel on its slowest settings, on high it will chew thru the horn.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Jacksonville, Alabama
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    Got the scope mounted on it last night, so we made a trip to the range today. I put about 30 rounds down range during the break-in process. I was shooting some cheap Prvi partisan ammo before starting to work on some handloads for it. This is the first 5 shots at 100 yds after I got it zeroed. Looks promising, I am sure this will tighten up once I break out the accubonds.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    South East Colorado
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    6,980

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    Dayum!!!
    I'm an addict...archery, rifles, shotguns, handguns, muzzleloaders, hunting, fishing, fly fishing..and I don't want rehab

    CWEH...Colorado's Worst Elk Hunter 2007-2016 (but I'm still damned sexy)

  18. #18

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    Excellent group!

    Thanks for the detail on the horn & inlay work, very helpful. Going to start taking some woodworking classes so I can turn a blank into a stock and the horn aspect is very much on my mind!
    A lesson was learned to not mix together silver bullets and a forum site.
    Fowl_Minded

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Andover, Minnesota
    Posts
    2,778

    Default

    That is one classy rifle. Well done.
    “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.” - Jack London

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