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  1. Default Big Fin - How about an episode on the Plains Indian History

    Last year while hunting the Big Belts my buddy showed me a bunch of Teepee circles. I had never heard of them much less seen one. We also saw a bunch of artifacts from an area where the Indians had camped near the Smith River. Latter on during the hunt I was shown the Bridger Mountains and Crazy Mountains on the distant sky line. Off course there is a bunch of history around those ranges. Have you considered a pod caste on the history of these cool places we get to hunt. The story's of the Crow, Suoix, Jim Bridger, Meeks, Johnston and others. Maybe knowing these characters better would enrich the hunting experience. It might be interesting to have an expert talk about things we can look for while hunting that would connect us to the history of the area. Stan Vestal wrote some great books on these subjects - but he's gone now. Anyway, just food for thought!
    Last edited by ErictheRed; 04-21-2017 at 06:47 AM.

  2. #2

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    Its amazing how much of that stuff you can find if you know what to look for.
    Lots of graves out there too.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    New Mexico
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    1,126

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    Like.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    154

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    How about a youtube video/hunt actually showing what some of this stuff looks like, I'm sure I've stumbled across stuff I had know idea about what it even was.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
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    12,146

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    We have found lots of it while out hunting. For two reasons, we won't be doing it.

    First, to get a public land permit to do what you ask is impossible. One of the requirements of our film permits is archaeological and paleontology clearance. In other words, determination that our location and activities will not harm or alter the archaeological and paleontology articles on the landscape.

    Second and most importantly, I won't do it for my own personal reasons. I've seen too much important native history get ruined when the public learns of it. I don't want to contribute to that.

    We have found some really cool stuff. My favorite is in Arizona. I had an archery antelope tag. I pointed to a small rock pile that rose from the floor of a sage-covered playa. I remarked that it looked like a good ambush location for antelope coming to water in the low spot of the playa. When we got there, a small rock wall was buried but dirt and sage, but could easily be seen as some sort of old rock wall. Even with a small bit of sweeping sand off the rock wall, native pottery was found in big pieces. I swore the two camera guys to secrecy. It is still on my GPS, but I will never tell a soul where it is, as it would surely be ruined.

    Sitting there, it was cool to think that someone, possibly a thousand years ago, sat with a bow in hand, hoping to make an antelope his dinner. Someday, I plan to go back and try to learn more about that specific spot.

    Below is a spot where I found a bunch of flat rocks with grinding pockets in them. It was about fifty yards from my elk camp in central Montana. There were about a dozen of these rocks within a twenty yard radius.

    Just above our camp was a cliff that broke a large expanse of flat prairie to our north, much of which has now been usurped by fire-suppressed Ponderos saplings. Though I was chasing elk, it made me wonder how many Blackfeet sat at this same camp, rendering bison into Pemmican and other native foods. This is on BLM land and I should probably give the coordinates to the BLM, but I would rather the world not know where it is and screw it up as usually happens.

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    I grew up exploring the Indian Mounds in my back yard. The Ojibway/Anishinaabe were the indigenous people and they are one of many cultures who buried their dead (and the deceased's valuables) by building mounds. These mounds were in great number along the Rainy, Littlefork, and Big Fork Rivers. Unfortunately, they all got trashed within a few years of discovery. That has probably shaped my opinion about not wanting people to know where some of these treasures exist.

    Thanks for the suggestion. Being a native history junkie, I like your idea. But, for reasons mentioned above I won't be doing it for TV.
    My name is Randy Newberg and I approved this post. What is written is my opinion, and my opinion only.

    "Hunt when you can. You're gonna run outta health before you run outta money."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    570

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    It would make a very interesting podcast though - some stories and history would be cool.

    I agree 100% with Randy on keeping these places "unknown". I know a couple of folks in the Bozeman area that could help research, if you are so inclined.

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    Thanks Big Fin - I respect your position. Thank you for cool pictures. When I saw all the tepee circles ruined by the agricultural fields it really bothered me. So I understand. In any case, I love the pod casts and I'll keep on suggesting ideas. I'll give a good one eventually!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
    Posts
    12,146

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    Quote Originally Posted by ErictheRed View Post
    Thanks Big Fin - I respect your position. Thank you for cool pictures. When I saw all the tepee circles ruined by the agricultural fields it really bothered me. So I understand. In any case, I love the pod casts and I'll keep on suggesting ideas. I'll give a good one eventually!
    My reference below was about not doing it for TV. If I could connect it to conservation, hunting, or public lands, I would gladly have some experts on the podcast to discuss those cultures and how they might have influenced our situations today. Just not sure if that connection exists. I bet someone out there has made a study of it, just that I don't know of them.

    Thanks for tossing it out for consideration.
    My name is Randy Newberg and I approved this post. What is written is my opinion, and my opinion only.

    "Hunt when you can. You're gonna run outta health before you run outta money."

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    Different, but I hunt white tails adjacent to the Manassas national battlefield. I've found pictures of soldiers standing along Bull Run within 50yds of where I have a tree stand. Kind of cool to think about while in the stand.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ErictheRed View Post
    Thanks Big Fin - I respect your position. Thank you for cool pictures. When I saw all the tepee circles ruined by the agricultural fields it really bothered me. So I understand. In any case, I love the pod casts and I'll keep on suggesting ideas. I'll give a good one eventually!
    Thank you Big Fin.
    Interactions between native americans and white men were not all giving them beads, trinkets and peace medals. Most were less than positive. A lot of what we were taught in school was candy coated rubish.

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    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

    Cree Prophecy

  11. #11

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    Cool stuff BF.
    Have a stone hunt pit on my place & am always finding aritifacts, which I usually just put back. Pottery shards, arrowheads,grinding stones,tools.

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