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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    286

    Default Sell me a camera

    I will be in the market for a camera this summer. I have always loved taking pictures of wildlife ever since I was young. I enjoy that as much as looking at an animal through the scope and pulling the trigger. I know there are a lot of HT people who take amazing pictures. Depending on how much business I get with my private contracting this summer for certified hay and straw will determine how much I will spend on one.

    I am looking at $1,000-$1,500 for the camera and a lens or two. Am I better off buying a higher priced camera and maybe one lens right away rather than a mediocre one and a couple lens? I know Costco sells bundles on sale from time to time.

    Thanks for any input on what you guys like and dislike.

    Jamen
    What we do in life... echoes in eternity...

  2. #2

    Default

    I would put money towards a good lens and avoid the kit lens. If you are serious about getting into it (sounds like you are) it is worth investing in the decent lens right away. I use the lens that came with my kit some, but mostly for normal pictures and not for wildlife.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    409

    Default

    What exactly will you be using the camera for? Primarily wildlife? Packing into the back country?

    DSLRs are nice but the lenses that give you enough reach for wildlife photography are expensive and heavy.

    I've got a DSLR and a superzoom that I choose between depending on weight/space/how much I want the best photos possible/etc.

    I'm not sure what the lens selection is like, but Sony and Fuji's mirrorless cameras have very good image quality. For DSLRs, Canon and Nikon are the two big players with a wide array of lenses to choose from.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    286

    Default

    I will be doing both pictures from my truck and packing in back country. I do not do a ton of back country right now but I am doing more each and every year.

    Thank you for your input guys!
    What we do in life... echoes in eternity...

  5. Default

    You might look at the Sony RX10 III. It is considered a "bridge" camera so it doesn't take interchangeable lenses but it has a 24-600mm zoom range. It has a Zeiss lens and a 1" sensor. With that zoom range it is good for anything from landscapes to wildlife. A DSLR with a wildlife lens will be bigger and heavier than the RX10. Supposedly it is a really good camera for video too. I know if I had the money laying around I would own one.

    https://www.amazon.com/Sony-DSC-RX10...ords=sony+rx10

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Almost North Dakota, not quite Canada
    Posts
    568

    Default

    I assume you are talking DSLR, and that's all I really have experience with. If I were starting from scratch, I would buy a camera body that is not the newest model - one that might be two or three models ago (will save quite a bit of money), and then get the best glass I can afford. Successive camera models rarely show drastic improvements in quality from one to the next. The quality of the lens makes a much bigger difference.

    That said, those 20-55mm zoom kit lenses aren't completely terrible for general shooting. I use one and I get decent pics with it, you just have to be aware of its limitations. If you can get a decent price on a camera body plus one of those, go for it. You can usually find kits like that for somewhere in the neighborhood of $300-$500. For a longer lens if you want something that you can travel with or carry in a pack, I'd look at a tele-zoom. They are smaller and lighter, and there are a lot of affordable options that provide decent pictures too. That's what I have - I've carried one camera body and those two lenses in a backpack around Costa Rica, on hunting trips, on vacations. I still drool over fancy lenses (someday!) but I can do quite a bit with the lenses I have. A lot depends on what you want to photograph, and how you want to do it I suppose. You can always upgrade gear down the road, as your skills improve or your needs change.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigsky2 View Post
    You might look at the Sony RX10 III. It is considered a "bridge" camera so it doesn't take interchangeable lenses but it has a 24-600mm zoom range. It has a Zeiss lens and a 1" sensor. With that zoom range it is good for anything from landscapes to wildlife. A DSLR with a wildlife lens will be bigger and heavier than the RX10. Supposedly it is a really good camera for video too. I know if I had the money laying around I would own one.

    https://www.amazon.com/Sony-DSC-RX10...ords=sony+rx10

    Not to step on Jamen's thread but this camera looks amazing! Thanks for the lead BigSky.

  8. #8

    Default

    I was in the same spot as you last year and decided against a DSLR because of the zoom problem. I have a Nikon p-900 super zoom that takes real quality pictures at great distances for a lot less then a DSLR, and I don't need to do anything with lenses.

    GoatName:  DSCN0751.jpg
Views: 223
Size:  78.0 KB these are over 100 yards from me

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Thanks for all the input guys I will definitely research the suggestions made here.
    What we do in life... echoes in eternity...

  10. #10

    Default

    I also have the Nikon P 900. The zoom is like taking pictures with a good spotting scope. This bull is a easy 1/2 mile from me. Maybe not as good of picture quality as some other cameras but 600 dollars at Best Buy
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  11. #11

    Default

    I would recommend that you "know what you are getting into". I don't doubt that you do. What I mean when I say that is, a lot of people buy an expensive DSLR and expensive lenses expecting to be better photographers and able to take better pictures. For a lot of people, that is not the case. Many people end up spending a large amount of money only to learn that with said equipment, they take worse pictures than those they take with their $100 point and shoot. Some, to tell themselves they didn't make a mistake, end up using that expensive equipment on the automatic pre-set. I'm not trying to dissuade you. It is a fun hobby and I encourage everybody to learn enough more to make such equipment beneficial and enjoyable. I was that guy over many years through about 3 or 4 DSLR setups. I finally dove in a little further to learn a lot of the stuff that seemed alien to me. Finally, everything clicked to where I thought to myself, "self, I wish I knew all of this years ago". Good luck in your quest into the realm of a fun, rewarding and challenging hobby.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Montana seems to me to be what a small boy would think Texas is like from hearing Texans.”
    John Steinbeck

  12. #12

    Default

    I have a Nikon DSLR that I'm looking to sell.
    Nikon D60 Gold Edition. Includes two lenses, camera body, battery+charger, carrying bag, manual, and strap. Lenses are 18-55mm & 55mm-200mm.
    It's in great shape and takes good pictures. Certainly there are more expensive cameras out there, but as others have suggested I would sink my money into lenses before an expensive camera body.
    This was my wife's camera and since I also have a DSLR we don't have any need for two of them.
    I'm looking for $250 + shipping. PM me if interested.

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