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  1. #51

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    Once you find your comfort zone, you won't need anybody else to validate it. Experience will tell you what to do. If somebody's asking the question, they probably don't have the experience and probably shouldn't be taking the shot. How does one get that experience? Well...There's a lot of good rules of thumb on this thread already.

    Why is this even an issue? Bow technology? Perhaps, but I believe that the main reason this is an issue is because we have the internet and social media and our egos. There is no requirement anywhere that we disclose the distances from which we shoot at animals, yet we all do. I always am curious and want to know how far somebody was, but does it detract from your story on social media or on here or wherever? Ignorance is bliss. Omitting details isn't lying in a situation like this. We're all here to learn from each other ultimately, so I guess one could argue that it's not our egos, but in the interest of full disclosure as a teachable moment that such details are disclosed. Either way, you've got to realize by now that if you're shooting at animals beyond 60 and feel the need to post it up, you're going to get some flak.

  2. #52

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    I remember not too many years ago, outdoor writers were trying to crucify Chuck Adams for advocating a 40 yard shot. Now we're talking about 100 yard shots. Too many variables like wind and animal moving.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by elkhnter View Post
    I remember not too many years ago, outdoor writers were trying to crucify Chuck Adams for advocating a 40 yard shot. Now we're talking about 100 yard shots. Too many variables like wind and animal moving.
    I remember when 100 yards was pushing it with a muzzleloader but now they can shoot well past that... Now an arrow at 100? Seriously

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idahoarcheryhunter View Post
    I remember when 100 yards was pushing it with a muzzleloader but now they can shoot well past that... Now an arrow at 100? Seriously
    It really is crazy I was out last season ringing an 8" gong at 200yards with no problem at all with my cousin's new muzz. I can do that no prob with my old muzz out to 150, but after that it is a wild guess where it will hit. He has since started shooting 300 yards with it. granted those are sationary steel targets, but it still amazes me.

    On the 100yard bow shot I don't have to worry about it. I practice 75 yards, my furthest kill was 52 yards and the doe ducked the arrow enough to get spine shot. 40 yards is my max for a deer. It blew me away when she ducked that far that fast.

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    F no!

  6. #56

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    I have a 2 step little formula for hunting ethics that I tend to hang my decisions on:

    1. Is it legal? If the answer is no, then don't proceed. If the answer is yes then...
    2. Will my conscience bother me after this? If the answer to this is yes, then do not proceed.

    Another one is: How would I feel about this if one of my kids did it?

    So anyway, 100 yard shot with a bow? For me, the answer is a clear no. There are folks out there that can shoot 100 yards all day long under controled conditions, but yeah, like others have said, there are way too many variables in any hunting situation to think 100 yards is a good idea in my opinion.

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by elkhnter View Post
    I remember not too many years ago, outdoor writers were trying to crucify Chuck Adams for advocating a 40 yard shot. Now we're talking about 100 yard shots. Too many variables like wind and animal moving.
    This.

    I remember Chuck getting crucified over that too. Funny how times change. I really dislike the direction bow hunting has largely gone. Seems like 25 years ago the prevailing philosophy was that if you aren't sure you can make the shot, you should pass. Now it's more like, how do you know you can't make the shot unless you try it.

    My longest shot on an animal was a cow elk at 54 yards. I knew exactly the distance and practiced regularly at 60, she was down quickly but I still didn't make a perfect lung shot on her and probably wouldn't do that again. There was more wind than I estimated and my arrow hit a little forward - still clipped an artery and she bled out in about 20 minutes, but it easily could have been a lost elk. I don't want that.

  8. #58
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    Unfortunately we often times find out our limits by making that "bad" shot. The animal many times ends up wounded and dying. While these experiences suck it's at these moments I believe that shape us into who we are as hunters. I've taken a shot with my bow that didn't work out. It was a frontal shot at super close range. The bull ran off and I never found it. I felt horrible and knew it wasn't the "text book" shot we learn about. Because of that I won't take that shot again. I had a friend take the same shot and I witnessed the bull take the hit and die. I know it can work but it has some risks. I'm not confident anymore personally. To each their own. I know some guys that are ringers with a bow and their range is way farther than mine. I guess until they have one of these moments I can't and won't judge them. Same goes for rifle shots. Hopefully though the ding bats that consistently wound animals will take a self assessment and stop the nonsense.
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    But what I do have are a very particular set of skills, skills I have acquired over a very long career

  9. #59

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    My longest shot registered 55.5 on my rangefinder and was definitely pushing the edge of my comfort zone. It was the bull in my avatar.
    Wind was calm, he had no idea I was there, but definitely wasn't getting any closer. The cow he was on was going to be moving off, and the cow, calf and spike at 15 yards from me, knew something was up. It was a 'now or never' moment.

    Although I wanted it closer, I had no doubt I could make that shot under those circumstances. I double lunged him and he didn't make it 30 yards. I couldn't imagine almost doubling that distance at a live animal, but I am also not going to place my limitations on others, as I know there are many others that coudn't have made that shot, and I hope wouldn't place their limitation on me.

  10. #60

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    One thing I have found, bowhunters will talk about the long shot that hit and killed. You never hear about the long shot that hit and wounded.

    The wounding loss difference between short and long range archery cannot be denied.
    Last edited by tjones; 04-23-2017 at 04:51 PM.

  11. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by tjones View Post
    One thing I have found, bowhunters will talk about the long shot that hit and killed. You never hear about the long shot that hit and wounded.

    The wounding loss difference between short and long range archery cannot be denied.
    Bingo! Too many things can happen between the time when the arrow leaves the bow to when it reaches the spot where the animal is supposed to be standing perfectly stiil.
    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

    Cree Prophecy

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    My son once made a great statement about golf witch applys here nicely ,he said "the diffence between a good player and a bad one is a bad player remembers his best shot and a good one remembers his worst " things that make you go hmmmm

  13. #63

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    Only as a follow up to a first hit under the proper circumstances.

  14. #64

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    Absolutely unethical in a hunting situation.

  15. #65

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    The most beat question of all time. Same as a sports radio show asking who your Mt. Rushmore of football players is. This question will never have a solid answer to it. Ive hunted with people that practice shooting at 140 yards and can shoot 10 inch groups at that range. Could they make a 100 yard shot...no problem. Last season I was in northern california and saw a hunter take a 28 yard shot that was way more reckless than a solid archer taking a 100 yard shot. The 28 yard hunter had no business or skill set to take that shot.

    I believe it is ethical to get as close as you possibly can and what is ethical for that specific shot. Ive laced 50 yard shots with no wind that were cake. Ive taken 20 yard shots that were way more difficult/borderline ethical with strong crosswinds/branches etc. Its a matter of that specific situation rather than just a yardage. Get over the yardage issue. Theres no set answer. This point has been beat into the ground. This is why its called "ethics."

    Get out and hunt. If you are confident and have the skills to make "the kill shot" then take it. If you don't then don't take it.
    Last edited by 805Bowhunter; 04-26-2017 at 03:20 PM.

  16. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sainte_Terrer View Post
    For me personally it is a question of flight time. I've met some very good shots who can consistently hit that far. However, none of them have yet been able to demonstrate control over wind gusts or an animal's movement. There is just too much that can go wrong from Point A to Point B. Deer jump strings at 30 yards all the time---how much more so at 100?
    I wont say what a person's distance limit should be it isn't up to me. One thing I will point out as far as animals jumping the string. I can only talk about deer.

    My rule of thumb that I have come up with myself is 20 yards and under deer can still jump the string. With that it is typically to late and you still hit close enough to where you were shooting.

    20-40 yards deer can jump the string and cause some real issues. A lot goes into this. If the deer isn't alerted it doesn't seem to matter. If they are alerted good luck.

    Over 40 yards, which I don't have experience with deer tend to not jump the string as much. This is based on some research and hearing other talk.

    I think it has to do with proximity to the deer, types of shots people will take and the noise of the equipment. Hard to get into great depth on here.

    With that I guess what I am saying is over 40 yard jumping the string becomes less of an issue.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxx View Post

    With that I guess what I am saying is over 40 yard jumping the string becomes less of an issue.
    What about the odds of an animal unexpectedly taking a casual step during a 2 sec arrow flight?
    One casual step is a gut shot animal! No?
    “LET ME TELL YOU WHY PEOPLE LIVE IN IDAHO…THEY LIVE IN IDAHO BECAUSE THEY LOVE THEIR PUBLIC LANDS. THEY LIKE ACCESS TO THEM FOR RECREATION, FOR HUNTING AND FISHING, OR ALL THE ACTIVITIES THEY DO ON PUBLIC LANDS.”
    -U.S. Representative Mike Simpson

  18. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by MTTINMAN59 View Post
    My son once made a great statement about golf witch applys here nicely ,he said "the diffence between a good player and a bad one is a bad player remembers his best shot and a good one remembers his worst " things that make you go hmmmm
    I hear what you are saying about shot selection. But one of the best attributes of most clutch athletes/performers is their ability to forget the bad shots...and have a short memory. When you pull the trigger with a bow, golf club, free throw, td pass, home run swing, etc..., you better be thinking about all the good shots and visualizing future success. Otherwise you are likley to have another bad one.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by LWC55 View Post
    When you pull the trigger with a bow, golf club, free throw, td pass, home run swing, etc..., you better be thinking about all the good shots and visualizing future success. Otherwise you are likley to have another bad one.
    Shooting to kill an animal is a far more serious undertaking than anything else on this list. Shanking a drive is not going o result in suffering/death/loss of your target. That is why hunters have ethics, and golfers have cocktails.

  20. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by elkduds View Post
    Shooting to kill an animal is a far more serious undertaking than anything else on this list. Shanking a drive is not going o result in suffering/death/loss of your target. That is why hunters have ethics, and golfers have cocktails.
    I have ethics and cocktails in both

  21. #71

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    Longest shot I ever took was a 46 yard shot at a buck in the river bottoms. He was calm, but took take step forward after I pulled the trigger. In an instant it went from a behind the shoulder to a gut shot. He was quartering and went out the off side ham. Too many things can happen even if you do everything perfectly.

  22. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by elkmagnet View Post
    What about the odds of an animal unexpectedly taking a casual step during a 2 sec arrow flight?
    One casual step is a gut shot animal! No?
    Sure but that isn't jumping the string. At 30 yards and alert a deer can move an incredible amount from the time you shoot until the arrow gets there by jumping the sting. As much as a deer over 40 can move from when you release that arrow. What about an animal doing the same on a 400 yard rifle shot. I think a lot of guys on here are capable of making 400 yard rifle shots. The animal could start to move as you are squeezing the trigger and bam gut shot.

    There is a calculated risk every time you pull the trigger on making a bad shot. It isn't for me to tell you what your capabilities are risk levels are on taking a shot. I have made some really good shots in my life and I have made some poor shots in my life. Some of the poor shots have come on chip shots where my concentration lacks because I think it is to easy, some are just from excitement cause of the size of the animal. I have been fortunate enough to still recover a high percentage of these animals because of the way I go after them after the fact. I think I have lost 2-3 deer in the last 20 years.

  23. Default

    A lot of practical, sound advice from those commenting here. I too immediately thought of the elapsed time of the arrow flight, and an Elk taking a step or two while it's in transit.
    That said, if you've already stuck the Elk, with what looks like a lethal hit, and THEN get a chance to shoot him again at long distance, that's another story. There's no such thing as too good of a blood trail if you can make it better and end the hunt sooner.

  24. #74

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    I don't even bow hunt and I know this 100 yard shot is a stupid idea. mtmuley

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxx View Post
    What about an animal doing the same on a 400 yard rifle shot. I think a lot of guys on here are capable of making 400 yard rifle shots. The animal could start to move as you are squeezing the trigger and bam gut shot.


    A bullet shot 400yd from a rifle at 3000fps would take approximately 1/3rd of a second flight time.
    That's close to the flight time of an arrow shot 30 yds at 300fps.

    Your thoughts would be close if you compared a 100 yrd arrow to a 1200+yd rifle shot.
    This is of course crude and ignoring the drag factor. That's where the numbers would tip dramatically.
    I would love to know how to calculate the flight time of an arrow at 100yd😀
    “LET ME TELL YOU WHY PEOPLE LIVE IN IDAHO…THEY LIVE IN IDAHO BECAUSE THEY LOVE THEIR PUBLIC LANDS. THEY LIKE ACCESS TO THEM FOR RECREATION, FOR HUNTING AND FISHING, OR ALL THE ACTIVITIES THEY DO ON PUBLIC LANDS.”
    -U.S. Representative Mike Simpson

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